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How Well Do the Current Federal Privacy Proposals Protect Your Privacy?

Ever since the Facebook/Cambridge Analytica story broke, privacy has been the talk of the town in Washington, DC, and conventional wisdom is that Congress will begin debating comprehensive privacy legislation in earnest in 2019. In preparation, members of Congress are starting to drop their message bills and discussion drafts. Public Knowledge has evaluated each of the proposals so far, and we offer our initial take here.

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The Case for Agency Authority

One of the first lessons I learned as an advocate at Public Knowledge? “Regulation” and “rulemaking authority” are dirty words in too many parts of Capitol Hill. This is perhaps unsurprising to people who have worked on tech and telecom policy longer than I have. Or, for that matter, to people who work on environmental policy or any number of other issues. Nonetheless, this is my case for why I am pro-agency rulemaking authority, and you should be too.

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Microsoft Recognizes and Faces the Challenges of Facial Recognition

Yesterday, Microsoft released its facial recognition principles, as well as a call for legislation regulating the technology. There’s a lot to like in Microsoft’s release.

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Google Plus Demonstrates We Can’t Trust Companies to Do the Right Thing

Last March, Google discovered a Google Plus bug that permitted developers to access as many as 500,000 Google Plus users’ private information – but didn’t tell anyone.

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Is California’s New Privacy Law Right for the United States?

At the end of June, California enacted what has been billed as a comprehensive privacy law. By all accounts, it was a rush job, negotiated in a week behind closed doors in a desperate and successful attempt to keep Californians for Consumer Privacy Campaign Chairman Alaistair MacTaggart’s privacy initiative off the November ballot. As sometimes happens, the law’s proponents and a few reporters may have overhyped the legislation – both given its current contents and because many expect it to change before its effective date in January 2020.

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