Posts by Alex Curtis:

A Reboot of the In the Know Podcast, where we present an overview of recent news and events regarding public policy and its effect on the information commons.  In this episode, Michael Weinberg and Alex Curtis discuss the following hot topics of the week: the Fring / Skype mobile video calling battle, PK’s “third way” reclassification filing, new business models for the music business, PK’s Allvid filing, and Brazil’s copyright reform proposals.

You can download and listen to the audio by clicking here (MP3) or stream it using the player below:

Want to subscribe to our podcast? Click here for the MP3 feed and here for the mixed audio/video feed.

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PK, the Silicon Flatirons, and the Information Technology & Innovation Foundation (ITIF) are hosting a discussion on FCC Reform, entitled: An FCC for the Internet Age: Reform and Standard-Setting. You can watch it right now:

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Today, Public Knowledge's Director of The Global Knowledge Initiative and Staff Attorney, Rashmi Rangnath is testifying before the US Trade Representative on the "Special 301" process. You can read her testimony here (PDF). There is not a webcast or official live coverage, per USTR rules that "prohibit the use of electronic media in its hearing room." So, despite this ban, we are relying on reports from the hearing room via twitter (using the #ustr hashtag), and hope to bring you more coverage as well.

If you're not familiar with the Special 301 process, the latest 5 Minutes with Harold Feld does a great job explaining what's going on. So does Rashmi's prior blog post — that encouraged so many of you to write comments to the USTR.

Lastly, we have a link to today's hearing schedule, that tells us who is testifying and who the Special 301 committee members are (PDF) … also pasted below:

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Free Culture X, a conference of Students for Free Culture, will be held February 13th at the George Washington University in Washington, D.C. Keynote addresses will be given by Harvard Berkman Center co-founder Jonathan Zittrain, PK President and cofounder Gigi Sohn, and the director of American University's Center for Social Media, Pat Aufderheide.

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Yesterday, the MPAA and RIAA made a giant political misstep by refusing to participate in a debate about three strikes. In doing so, they exposed the public and a number of US policy makers to policy that would strip Internet subscribers of their constitutional due process rights.

On Tuesday and Wednesday, I attended this year's State of the Net Conference beautifully orchestrated by Tim Lordan and his crew at the Internet Caucus Advisory Committee.

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If you were following our tweets yesterday (and don't forget to follow the tweets of our collective staff, found on this twitter list, too), you may have seen an update that PK Legal Director Harold Feld participated in a discussion about set top boxes, over-the-top Internet video, cutting the cord, and net neutrality on the Kojo Nnamdi Show. If you missed the live show, you can read the transcripts and listen to the recorded audio stream here.

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When last we spoke to you, back in May, about HR 1319, it had recently been introduced and was just having a hearing. The bill's sponsors want you, the consumer, to be protected from software that can share the private and valuable files on your computer with others via the network. The original bill, in name only, focussed on P2P file sharing software, but the language of the bill actually did very little to limit its scope. Today, Public Knowledge has obtained the bill's new language and tomorrow the bill will be marked up in full Committee, likely with little complaint.

Except for ours.

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Today, American University’s Center for Social Media and AU Washington College of Law’s Program on Information Justice and Intellectual Property, together with Stanford Law School’s Fair Use Project have put together a straight-forward video on what fair use is and isn’t in the world of online video (and beyond). The video is a 7 1/2 minute synopsis of what you’d learn if you had read their Code of Best Practices released in July 2008 which we covered here, and makes understanding fair use, and its importance in our society, easy.

Embedded below is the video. Kudos again to all that were involved.

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You may have read that this past week SlingMedia finally released its much anticipated SlingPlayer for the iPhone. It's an application that lets you remotely stream video and remotely control your home television, from your computer, mobile device, and now iPhone. However the app has been relegated to only working on the iPhone via WiFi, not the available 3G data network, at the request of AT&T. AT&T's justification for this is as follows:

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Every three years, the Copyright Office holds hearings to listen to commenters suggestions for exemptions to the Digital Millennium Copyright Act’s prohibition on circumvention of access controls. We’ve previously written about the handful of exemptions that the Office has granted (which expire and must be renewed every three years). This year, we’re on the ground and live-twittering what’s going on. Today, Mehan is manning the Public Knowledge twitter account picking out a number of choice quotes and responding to questions.

But we’re not alone at the hearing. A number of twitterers are there, and you can follow the related tweets using the #dmca1201 tag.

And now, thanks to Kristen for sharing her CoverItLive, we now have an embedded client so you can read the tweet-reports of what’s going on at the hearing live below:

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