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App Store Control Is Less Important Than Human Rights, Actually 

October 11, 2019 Apple , Free Expression , Free Speech , Global , Human Rights , Privacy , security

I have written about app stores at length before but it is worth reiterating a few points given the recent news about Apple removing access to the Hkmap.live app (which helps people track police activity) and Google removing access to The Revolution of Our Times (a protest game).  First, Apple’s (and Google’s) explanations don’t pass […]

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DoH: Neither the Cause Of, Nor Solution To, All the Internet’s Problems 

October 9, 2019

Both Mozilla and Google are rolling out some version of DNS-over-HTTPS (DoH) in their respective web browsers, Firefox and Chrome. Internet service providers and others are up in arms. This post will try to explain why at least two of the criticisms–on privacy and competition grounds–don’t make a lot of sense. The technical arguments, on […]

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What’s Next for Net Neutrality

October 2, 2019 FCC , Legislation , Litigation , Net Neutrality , Title II

As you may have heard, the long-awaited decision in Mozilla v. FCC came out yesterday. First the bad news: The Federal Communications Commission won on the main issue, which is broadband reclassification. But there’s good news, too, in that the Court completely rejected the FCC’s attempts to prevent states from passing their own net neutrality […]

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Local Governments Can Work Around Problems in the TV Marketplace Themselves, with Municipal TV

September 25, 2019 Broadcast Licenses , Copyright , Retransmission Consent , STELA , STELAR

The laws around broadcasting and the retransmission of broadcast signals by cable and satellite companies are built up around a set of assumptions. One of the most basic is that individual broadcasters broadcast their signal to a specific geographic market where people can pick it up for free over the air, and pay TV providers […]

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Speech and Commerce: What Section 230 Should and Should Not Protect

September 24, 2019 Content Liability , Free Expression , Section 230 , Section 230 Series

This is the fourth blog post in a series about Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act. You can view the full series here. Section 230 plays an important role in allowing sites with user-generated content to operate in general–since it shields them from most liability for third-party speech–while giving them the ability to moderate […]

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