Posts by John Bergmayer:

Libraries have been central to culture, education, and research for centuries. Libraries have been part of America since the early 18th Century; the most famous early American library, (though not the first), was founded by Benjamin Franklin and others in Philadelphia in 1731. Libraries have taken many shapes — they’ve been public and private; membership-based […]
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phone icons There’s a common theme in many proposals to amend Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act — the idea that companies need to just follow their terms of service consistently and fairly. Of course, I agree. Who doesn’t? As I detailed in a paper in 2018, I believe that dominant platforms should give their users […]
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garden Today, we’re releasing a new paper, “Tending the Garden: How to Ensure that App Stores Put Users First.” It is topical, because this week is also Apple’s Worldwide Developer Conference — an annual event primarily geared toward software creators. This event gives them a preview of upcoming operating system versions and application programming interfaces (APIs) […]
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When Public Knowledge came out against the proposed AT&T/Time Warner merger in 2017, we were worried that the merger would create both the incentive for the combined company to withhold, or charge more for its own content to rival distributors, and to discriminate against competing content on its own distribution services. The merger went through […]
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After a very long build-up, Facebook has finally announced the make-up of its Oversight Board.  This board is an important step by Facebook towards recognizing that the decisions it makes, as a dominant platform, have more public significance than editorial and curation decisions made by others. But what many people have called a “Supreme Court” […]
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ticketmaster tickets A decade ago, the Department of Justice approved the merger of Ticketmaster and Live Nation — combining the biggest concert promoter, a major venue operator and artist manager, and the largest ticket provider under one roof. The anticompetitive implications of this deal were enormous. The combined company would be able to use its relationships with […]
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Don’t be disappointed, but this post isn’t going to give you a complete history of the 1992 Cable Act. That law had a lot of great ideas — and led to some great results — but it also had some disappointments, as the law was either watered down or poorly implemented. However, one of its […]
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Communications networks and other platforms are valuable in large part because of their users. One effect of this is that networks that already have the most users tend to grow even larger. Left unchecked, this can cause significant competition problems and leave individual private companies in charge of vital communications infrastructure. Even if antitrust law […]
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apple app store logo I have written about app stores at length before but it is worth reiterating a few points given the recent news about Apple removing access to the Hkmap.live app (which helps people track police activity) and Google removing access to The Revolution of Our Times (a protest game).  First, Apple’s (and Google’s) explanations don’t pass […]
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tv simpsons Both Mozilla and Google are rolling out some version of DNS-over-HTTPS (DoH) in their respective web browsers, Firefox and Chrome. Internet service providers and others are up in arms. This post will try to explain why at least two of the criticisms–on privacy and competition grounds–don’t make a lot of sense. The technical arguments, on […]
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