Posts by John Bergmayer:

google and oracle logos I’m happy about the Supreme Court’s 6-2 decision in Google v. Oracle, affirming that Google’s reimplementation of the Java API for Android was a fair use and thus not copyright infringement. Google and Oracle’s competitions can breathe a sigh of relief, since a result that went the other way could have seriously inhibited the ability […]
Read More
various phone apps The effects that digital platforms like Facebook and Twitter play in our society, and our democracy, have been under increasingly heavy scrutiny. Now, people are rightly looking at the platforms’ role in last week’s violent insurrection at the U.S. Capitol: both at how the attack was organized and instigated and at the platforms’ reactions to […]
Read More
fuse media logo One of the most important and difficult goals of media policy is preserving and promoting voices of marginalized communities and diverse perspectives. It’s important because a functioning democracy requires informed points of view from multiple perspectives. There should be media that speak to and speak for everyone in our country. This applies to all media, […]
Read More
Libraries have been central to culture, education, and research for centuries. Libraries have been part of America since the early 18th Century; the most famous early American library, (though not the first), was founded by Benjamin Franklin and others in Philadelphia in 1731. Libraries have taken many shapes — they’ve been public and private; membership-based […]
Read More
phone icons There’s a common theme in many proposals to amend Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act — the idea that companies need to just follow their terms of service consistently and fairly. Of course, I agree. Who doesn’t? As I detailed in a paper in 2018, I believe that dominant platforms should give their users […]
Read More
garden Today, we’re releasing a new paper, “Tending the Garden: How to Ensure that App Stores Put Users First.” It is topical, because this week is also Apple’s Worldwide Developer Conference — an annual event primarily geared toward software creators. This event gives them a preview of upcoming operating system versions and application programming interfaces (APIs) […]
Read More
When Public Knowledge came out against the proposed AT&T/Time Warner merger in 2017, we were worried that the merger would create both the incentive for the combined company to withhold, or charge more for its own content to rival distributors, and to discriminate against competing content on its own distribution services. The merger went through […]
Read More
After a very long build-up, Facebook has finally announced the make-up of its Oversight Board.  This board is an important step by Facebook towards recognizing that the decisions it makes, as a dominant platform, have more public significance than editorial and curation decisions made by others. But what many people have called a “Supreme Court” […]
Read More
ticketmaster tickets A decade ago, the Department of Justice approved the merger of Ticketmaster and Live Nation — combining the biggest concert promoter, a major venue operator and artist manager, and the largest ticket provider under one roof. The anticompetitive implications of this deal were enormous. The combined company would be able to use its relationships with […]
Read More
Don’t be disappointed, but this post isn’t going to give you a complete history of the 1992 Cable Act. That law had a lot of great ideas — and led to some great results — but it also had some disappointments, as the law was either watered down or poorly implemented. However, one of its […]
Read More