Posts by Katy Tasker:

The following is attributed to Gigi B. Sohn, president and CEO of Public Knowledge:
 
“The reports that Comcast is offering a video product through the Xbox 360 without the data counting toward the customer’s data cap raises questions not only of the justification for the caps but, more importantly, of the survival of an Open Internet.
 
“This type of arrangement is exactly the type of situation the Federal Communications Commission’s (FCC) rules on the Open Internet were designed to prevent — that an Internet Service Provider juggles the rules to give itself an advantage over a competitor.
 
“The Xbox 360 provides a number of video services to compete for customer dollars, yet only one service is not counted against the data cap — the one provided by Comcast.
 

Read More

Today Public Knowledge launched the Internet Blueprint, an ambitious project to develop bills that will help make the internet a better place for everyone. The site consists of six new bills Congress could pass today, as well as a way for the public to submit and vote on their own ideas.

“There are lots of people with great ideas about what rights and protections Internet users should have.  Public Knowledge is taking the next step by putting those ideas into a form that Congress and other policymakers can consider,” said Michael Weinberg, the PK senior staff attorney who is coordinating the project.

Read More

Recap of Last Week

Last week, negotiators met in LA behind closed doors to discuss the intellectual property chapter of a new international trade agreement called the Trans-Pacific Partnership, or TPP. The TPP is the frightening sequel to another international trade agreement in the news recently: the Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement, known as ACTA. Simultaneous to the private TPP negotiations, a separately organized public interest briefing on concerns with the TPP was actually kicked out of the hotel where it was supposed to have taken place. 

Read More
Blog

A 2011 Recap and 2012 Preview

January 4, 2012

As we ring in the new year here at Public Knowledge, we’re looking back on a busy 2011 and looking forward to an exciting 2012. Here are our highlights from the last year, and our predictions for the year to come.

Top 5 Moments of 2011:

1. AT&T Surrendered
Nothing beats the feeling of facing off against a lobbying machine like AT&T over its proposed takeover of T-Mobile, and winning.

2. Congress Didn’t Kill an Open Internet
Congress’s attempt to ax the FCC’s ability to preserve the open internet was thwarted .

Read More

The following statement is attributed to Harold Feld, legal director of Public Knowledge:

“We congratulate the FCC on its announcement today that it has certified a database and device capable of using the TV white spaces. This marks a new era in open wireless technology, which already contributes $50 billion every year to the American economy. 

“The newly certified ‘Super WiFi’ will increase the capacity of these networks tenfold, improving the wireless broadband experience for all Americans while creating new opportunities for innovation and job creation.”

Read More

The following statement is attributed to Harold Feld, legal director of Public Knowledge:

“In this age of cynicism, it is important for the American people to see that Washington does not always go to the highest bidder. The Department of Justice and the Federal Communications Commission stood up to tremendous lobbying pressure as AT&T spent tens of millions of dollars trying to push this merger through. 

“We hope that AT&T and T-Mobile will focus on deploying the best, most competitive networks possible rather than trying to merge to duopoly. These businesses are fundamentally sound, and have what it takes to bring broadband and jobs to America on their own. We look forward to seeing them rethink what’s possible, rather than trying to rule the air.

Read More

Per standard procedure, Verizon has officially applied with the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) to purchase spectrum from Spectrum Co. 

The following statement is attributed to Harold Feld, legal director of Public Knowledge:

“It is critical that the FCC be prepared to act if the application and the agreements raise the possibility of anti-competitive coordination. While it is important to get spectrum into productive use, the possibility that this may create ‘backdoor’ channels by which competitors may divide the market and keep out potential new entrants is very real. The FCC has authority to insist on reviewing the associated agreements, whatever the parties may say.”

Read More

House Judiciary Committee Chairman Smith just announced that markup of SOPA will resume at 9:00 A.M. on Wednesday, December 21, 2011.

The following statement is attributed to Sherwin Siy, deputy legal director of Public Knowledge:

“Continuing a markup on December 21, when many members may well be absent, demonstrates a clear desire to continue dodging the questions raised by experts, members, and the public.

“This unwillingness to take expert evidence, listen to constituents, or conduct due diligence in investigating the extraordinary harms risked by SOPA shows a process divorced from representation, responsibility, and reality.”

Read More

Following almost a day and a half of heated debate, the House Judiciary Committee adjourned its markup of the Stop Online Piracy Act, or SOPA. Movement on the legislation will pick back up when the House reconvenes at the end of January 2012.

The following statement is attributed to Sherwin Siy, deputy legal director of Public Knowledge:

“Throughout the markup process, there has been clear disagreement and misunderstanding among members themselves about what is in the bill, to say nothing of what it actually does. 

“SOPA, as written, would threaten the functioning, freedom, and economic potential of the internet. We hope the members of the House Judiciary Committee take this break as an opportunity to carefully examine the legitimate concerns raised by the tech industry, cybersecurity experts, public interest groups, and human-rights organizations.”

Read More

Contact: Katie Barr
Glen Echo Group
202-525-4343
kbarr@glenechogroup.com

Congress should not impose “harmful constraints on the ability of the FCC to make appropriate spectrum allocation decisions,” 20 companies, trade associations, and public interest groups said today. 

In a letter to the Senate and House, the groups expressed concern over spectrum allocation provisions included in the JOBS Act passed by the House on Tuesday, and urged negotiators to “modify these provisions to preserve the FCC’s existing authority to respond to changes in this continually evolving and dynamic market,” saying,

Read More