Posts by Martyn Griffen:

On Wednesday, the Senate Judiciary Committee held a hearing on the reauthorization of the Satellite Television Extension and Localism Act (STELA). This Act is the most recent version in a series of authorizations dating back to the 1980s that governs the carriage of broadcast signals by satellite television providers. The current Act contains several provisions that are set to expire at the end of 2014, and this hearing addressed whether or not provisions in this Act should be extended and for how long.
Read More
The Agriculture Act of 2014 is signed into law, along with a provision creating a rural gigabit network pilot program. This is big news for some rural communities.
Read More

The “Consumer Choice in Video Devices Act” Would Move Set-Top Competition Backward


November has been a promising month for the prospect of reform in the video marketplace, with Senate Commerce Committee Chairman Jay Rockefeller’s (D-WV) ambitious Consumer Choice in Online Video Act.  While we’re eager to see how Congress responds to Chairman Rockefeller’s bill, we’re also keeping an eye on video-related activity on the other side of the Hill.

Back in September, Rep. Bob Latta (R-OH), the Vice-Chairman of the House Energy and Commerce Committee’s Subcommittee on Communications and Technology introduced H.R. 3196, the Consumer Choice in Video Devices Act, a bill that would amend the Communications Act to restrict FCC authority for adopting certain rules or policies relating to multichannel video programming distributors (such as cable operators).  In particular, this bill targets Section 629 of the Telecom Act and would end the “integration ban,” an FCC requirement that cable operator-supplied set-top boxes use some of the same technology–currently CableCARD–that third-party device makers use.

Read More

Senate Commerce Committee Chairman Rockefeller’s bill takes an ambitious approach toward the video marketplace of the future.


Tuesday, Senate Commerce Committee Chairman Jay Rockefeller (S-WV) introduced the Consumer Choice in Online Video Act, which seeks to address the anticompetitive and anti-consumer forces at work in today’s video marketplace. This bill would prevent cable providers from engaging in discriminatory measures against online video operators and would ensure that online video providers can access valuable programming. As we’ve said numerous times before, the current state of the video marketplace is outdated and in need of reform.You’ve got incumbent distributors, broadcasters, cable providers, network affiliates, with relationships locked into place and codified in US law.  This arrangement benefits the incumbents but does nothing for innovation, competition, or consumer choice.Tech companies tease the marketplace with hints of new video devices on the horizon but time and again consumers are left empty-handed and wanting. Technology isn’t what’s holding back the marketplace, the outdated video policies are.

Read More

As communications technology changes, it is important that all Americans have access to reliable communications service. Rural America cannot get left behind.


From Sunday, June 23 to Wednesday, June 26, 2013 participants representing more than 500 local, regional, and national advocacy organizations gathered outside of DC to participate in the National Rural Assembly.  The Assembly works to build a stronger, more vibrant rural America and during the conference attendees discussed rural policies regarding health care, education, community development, and broadband deployment.

Read More

No posts by this author.

Posts by Martyn Griffen:

On Wednesday, the Senate Judiciary Committee held a hearing on the reauthorization of the Satellite Television Extension and Localism Act (STELA). This Act is the most recent version in a series of authorizations dating back to the 1980s that governs the carriage of broadcast signals by satellite television providers. The current Act contains several provisions that are set to expire at the end of 2014, and this hearing addressed whether or not provisions in this Act should be extended and for how long.
Read More
The Agriculture Act of 2014 is signed into law, along with a provision creating a rural gigabit network pilot program. This is big news for some rural communities.
Read More

The “Consumer Choice in Video Devices Act” Would Move Set-Top Competition Backward


November has been a promising month for the prospect of reform in the video marketplace, with Senate Commerce Committee Chairman Jay Rockefeller’s (D-WV) ambitious Consumer Choice in Online Video Act.  While we’re eager to see how Congress responds to Chairman Rockefeller’s bill, we’re also keeping an eye on video-related activity on the other side of the Hill.

Back in September, Rep. Bob Latta (R-OH), the Vice-Chairman of the House Energy and Commerce Committee’s Subcommittee on Communications and Technology introduced H.R. 3196, the Consumer Choice in Video Devices Act, a bill that would amend the Communications Act to restrict FCC authority for adopting certain rules or policies relating to multichannel video programming distributors (such as cable operators).  In particular, this bill targets Section 629 of the Telecom Act and would end the “integration ban,” an FCC requirement that cable operator-supplied set-top boxes use some of the same technology–currently CableCARD–that third-party device makers use.

Read More

Senate Commerce Committee Chairman Rockefeller’s bill takes an ambitious approach toward the video marketplace of the future.


Tuesday, Senate Commerce Committee Chairman Jay Rockefeller (S-WV) introduced the Consumer Choice in Online Video Act, which seeks to address the anticompetitive and anti-consumer forces at work in today’s video marketplace. This bill would prevent cable providers from engaging in discriminatory measures against online video operators and would ensure that online video providers can access valuable programming. As we’ve said numerous times before, the current state of the video marketplace is outdated and in need of reform.You’ve got incumbent distributors, broadcasters, cable providers, network affiliates, with relationships locked into place and codified in US law.  This arrangement benefits the incumbents but does nothing for innovation, competition, or consumer choice.Tech companies tease the marketplace with hints of new video devices on the horizon but time and again consumers are left empty-handed and wanting. Technology isn’t what’s holding back the marketplace, the outdated video policies are.

Read More

As communications technology changes, it is important that all Americans have access to reliable communications service. Rural America cannot get left behind.


From Sunday, June 23 to Wednesday, June 26, 2013 participants representing more than 500 local, regional, and national advocacy organizations gathered outside of DC to participate in the National Rural Assembly.  The Assembly works to build a stronger, more vibrant rural America and during the conference attendees discussed rural policies regarding health care, education, community development, and broadband deployment.

Read More

No posts by this author.

Posts by Martyn Griffen:

On Wednesday, the Senate Judiciary Committee held a hearing on the reauthorization of the Satellite Television Extension and Localism Act (STELA). This Act is the most recent version in a series of authorizations dating back to the 1980s that governs the carriage of broadcast signals by satellite television providers. The current Act contains several provisions that are set to expire at the end of 2014, and this hearing addressed whether or not provisions in this Act should be extended and for how long.
Read More
The Agriculture Act of 2014 is signed into law, along with a provision creating a rural gigabit network pilot program. This is big news for some rural communities.
Read More

The “Consumer Choice in Video Devices Act” Would Move Set-Top Competition Backward


November has been a promising month for the prospect of reform in the video marketplace, with Senate Commerce Committee Chairman Jay Rockefeller’s (D-WV) ambitious Consumer Choice in Online Video Act.  While we’re eager to see how Congress responds to Chairman Rockefeller’s bill, we’re also keeping an eye on video-related activity on the other side of the Hill.

Back in September, Rep. Bob Latta (R-OH), the Vice-Chairman of the House Energy and Commerce Committee’s Subcommittee on Communications and Technology introduced H.R. 3196, the Consumer Choice in Video Devices Act, a bill that would amend the Communications Act to restrict FCC authority for adopting certain rules or policies relating to multichannel video programming distributors (such as cable operators).  In particular, this bill targets Section 629 of the Telecom Act and would end the “integration ban,” an FCC requirement that cable operator-supplied set-top boxes use some of the same technology–currently CableCARD–that third-party device makers use.

Read More

Senate Commerce Committee Chairman Rockefeller’s bill takes an ambitious approach toward the video marketplace of the future.


Tuesday, Senate Commerce Committee Chairman Jay Rockefeller (S-WV) introduced the Consumer Choice in Online Video Act, which seeks to address the anticompetitive and anti-consumer forces at work in today’s video marketplace. This bill would prevent cable providers from engaging in discriminatory measures against online video operators and would ensure that online video providers can access valuable programming. As we’ve said numerous times before, the current state of the video marketplace is outdated and in need of reform.You’ve got incumbent distributors, broadcasters, cable providers, network affiliates, with relationships locked into place and codified in US law.  This arrangement benefits the incumbents but does nothing for innovation, competition, or consumer choice.Tech companies tease the marketplace with hints of new video devices on the horizon but time and again consumers are left empty-handed and wanting. Technology isn’t what’s holding back the marketplace, the outdated video policies are.

Read More

As communications technology changes, it is important that all Americans have access to reliable communications service. Rural America cannot get left behind.


From Sunday, June 23 to Wednesday, June 26, 2013 participants representing more than 500 local, regional, and national advocacy organizations gathered outside of DC to participate in the National Rural Assembly.  The Assembly works to build a stronger, more vibrant rural America and during the conference attendees discussed rural policies regarding health care, education, community development, and broadband deployment.

Read More

No posts by this author.

Posts by Martyn Griffen:

On Wednesday, the Senate Judiciary Committee held a hearing on the reauthorization of the Satellite Television Extension and Localism Act (STELA). This Act is the most recent version in a series of authorizations dating back to the 1980s that governs the carriage of broadcast signals by satellite television providers. The current Act contains several provisions that are set to expire at the end of 2014, and this hearing addressed whether or not provisions in this Act should be extended and for how long.
Read More
The Agriculture Act of 2014 is signed into law, along with a provision creating a rural gigabit network pilot program. This is big news for some rural communities.
Read More

The “Consumer Choice in Video Devices Act” Would Move Set-Top Competition Backward


November has been a promising month for the prospect of reform in the video marketplace, with Senate Commerce Committee Chairman Jay Rockefeller’s (D-WV) ambitious Consumer Choice in Online Video Act.  While we’re eager to see how Congress responds to Chairman Rockefeller’s bill, we’re also keeping an eye on video-related activity on the other side of the Hill.

Back in September, Rep. Bob Latta (R-OH), the Vice-Chairman of the House Energy and Commerce Committee’s Subcommittee on Communications and Technology introduced H.R. 3196, the Consumer Choice in Video Devices Act, a bill that would amend the Communications Act to restrict FCC authority for adopting certain rules or policies relating to multichannel video programming distributors (such as cable operators).  In particular, this bill targets Section 629 of the Telecom Act and would end the “integration ban,” an FCC requirement that cable operator-supplied set-top boxes use some of the same technology–currently CableCARD–that third-party device makers use.

Read More

Senate Commerce Committee Chairman Rockefeller’s bill takes an ambitious approach toward the video marketplace of the future.


Tuesday, Senate Commerce Committee Chairman Jay Rockefeller (S-WV) introduced the Consumer Choice in Online Video Act, which seeks to address the anticompetitive and anti-consumer forces at work in today’s video marketplace. This bill would prevent cable providers from engaging in discriminatory measures against online video operators and would ensure that online video providers can access valuable programming. As we’ve said numerous times before, the current state of the video marketplace is outdated and in need of reform.You’ve got incumbent distributors, broadcasters, cable providers, network affiliates, with relationships locked into place and codified in US law.  This arrangement benefits the incumbents but does nothing for innovation, competition, or consumer choice.Tech companies tease the marketplace with hints of new video devices on the horizon but time and again consumers are left empty-handed and wanting. Technology isn’t what’s holding back the marketplace, the outdated video policies are.

Read More

As communications technology changes, it is important that all Americans have access to reliable communications service. Rural America cannot get left behind.


From Sunday, June 23 to Wednesday, June 26, 2013 participants representing more than 500 local, regional, and national advocacy organizations gathered outside of DC to participate in the National Rural Assembly.  The Assembly works to build a stronger, more vibrant rural America and during the conference attendees discussed rural policies regarding health care, education, community development, and broadband deployment.

Read More

No posts by this author.

Posts by Martyn Griffen:

On Wednesday, the Senate Judiciary Committee held a hearing on the reauthorization of the Satellite Television Extension and Localism Act (STELA). This Act is the most recent version in a series of authorizations dating back to the 1980s that governs the carriage of broadcast signals by satellite television providers. The current Act contains several provisions that are set to expire at the end of 2014, and this hearing addressed whether or not provisions in this Act should be extended and for how long.
Read More
The Agriculture Act of 2014 is signed into law, along with a provision creating a rural gigabit network pilot program. This is big news for some rural communities.
Read More

The “Consumer Choice in Video Devices Act” Would Move Set-Top Competition Backward


November has been a promising month for the prospect of reform in the video marketplace, with Senate Commerce Committee Chairman Jay Rockefeller’s (D-WV) ambitious Consumer Choice in Online Video Act.  While we’re eager to see how Congress responds to Chairman Rockefeller’s bill, we’re also keeping an eye on video-related activity on the other side of the Hill.

Back in September, Rep. Bob Latta (R-OH), the Vice-Chairman of the House Energy and Commerce Committee’s Subcommittee on Communications and Technology introduced H.R. 3196, the Consumer Choice in Video Devices Act, a bill that would amend the Communications Act to restrict FCC authority for adopting certain rules or policies relating to multichannel video programming distributors (such as cable operators).  In particular, this bill targets Section 629 of the Telecom Act and would end the “integration ban,” an FCC requirement that cable operator-supplied set-top boxes use some of the same technology–currently CableCARD–that third-party device makers use.

Read More

Senate Commerce Committee Chairman Rockefeller’s bill takes an ambitious approach toward the video marketplace of the future.


Tuesday, Senate Commerce Committee Chairman Jay Rockefeller (S-WV) introduced the Consumer Choice in Online Video Act, which seeks to address the anticompetitive and anti-consumer forces at work in today’s video marketplace. This bill would prevent cable providers from engaging in discriminatory measures against online video operators and would ensure that online video providers can access valuable programming. As we’ve said numerous times before, the current state of the video marketplace is outdated and in need of reform.You’ve got incumbent distributors, broadcasters, cable providers, network affiliates, with relationships locked into place and codified in US law.  This arrangement benefits the incumbents but does nothing for innovation, competition, or consumer choice.Tech companies tease the marketplace with hints of new video devices on the horizon but time and again consumers are left empty-handed and wanting. Technology isn’t what’s holding back the marketplace, the outdated video policies are.

Read More

As communications technology changes, it is important that all Americans have access to reliable communications service. Rural America cannot get left behind.


From Sunday, June 23 to Wednesday, June 26, 2013 participants representing more than 500 local, regional, and national advocacy organizations gathered outside of DC to participate in the National Rural Assembly.  The Assembly works to build a stronger, more vibrant rural America and during the conference attendees discussed rural policies regarding health care, education, community development, and broadband deployment.

Read More

No posts by this author.