Posts by Meredith Whipple:

Two years ago, we committed to a #FightForFairness amid the new administration. Here are just the few of the ways we’ve worked to keep our promise:
Read More
Constant cyber hacks and distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attacks have unfortunately become the new normal in today’s internet-connected society. We’re not even a third of the way through 2018, and already dozens of data breaches and attacks have occurred, including hackers recently stealing information associated with nearly 900,000 credit cards used by Orbitz customers and more than 5 million credit and debit cards used at Saks Fifth Avenue, Saks Off Fifth, and Lord & Taylor stores. This unrelenting onslaught has significantly eroded consumer trust in the broad ecosystem of information and communications technologies (ICTs). The growing distrust risks a calamity of public confidence that could undermine both our economy and democracy, creating a ticking time bomb.
Read More
Cable costs are out of control. Over the last six years, consumers’ cable bills have increased by a whopping 40 percent.
Read More
A very problematic trend in copyright law has emerged during a series of cases these last few years. Courts have held that creating a copy of website code in a browser’s cache constitutes a copyright violation. The issue here is that copying site code into a browser is the only way you can browse the internet. This leaves us with an absurd outcome: The current legal scheme essentially makes browsing the web a copyright violation.
Read More
Last week, Federal Communications Commission Chairman Ajit Pai and Federal Trade Commission Acting Chairwoman Maureen Ohlhausen co-wrote an op-ed for the Washington Post entitled “No, Republicans didn’t just strip away your Internet privacy rights.” The team at Public Knowledge was troubled by the misinformation laid out in this op-ed. Issues like broadband privacy and net neutrality have serious long-term consequences, so we felt it was important to correct the record.
Read More
Today, Public Knowledge released a report examining the role of regulatory capture—both its sources and its consequences—at the U.S. Copyright Office.
Read More
Members of Congress adding unnecessary policy language or amendments, known as “riders,” to government appropriations bills is nothing new; it is a well-known tactic for getting controversial policies passed. Appropriations bills provide funding to government agencies, so they must be passed by Congress in order to keep everything moving. Some members of Congress use this as a loophole to try to sneak in language or amendments that will hurt existing policies and agencies.
Read More
The “special access” market has been a significant focus for Tom Wheeler since he became Chairman of the Federal Communications Commission nearly three years ago. But it is by no means a new issue for the FCC agenda.
Read More
One year ago today, the Federal Communications Commission enacted the strongest net neutrality rules in history. It was a day of celebration in the Internet policy community, after a daunting year of fighting against big Internet Service Providers like Verizon and Comcast that took advantage of a court’s decision to rule against the net neutrality rules we had at that time.
Read More
At the American Foundation for the Blind (AFB), we have worked for nearly a century to break down societal barriers and eliminate discrimination by achieving equal access to the world of copyrighted works. But for all the promise of technology to provide equal access to copyrighted works, the copyright laws that protect those works have sometimes served to impede that technology.
Read More