Posts by Public Knowledge:

            PK, along with the New America Foundation, has just filed its comments on the FCC’s proposed rules on the subject of wireless signal boosters. PK and NAF are trying to keep wireless boosters from getting tied to wireless carrier contracts. What’s a wireless signal booster? Here’s one:

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The following is a guest post from recent Duke Law School Graduate Steve McIntyre.

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Hi, everyone. My name is Anjali Bhat and I’m a summer intern at Public Knowledge. Unlike Chris and Mart, I have never worked here before, so this is a first-time introduction.

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Hello!  I’m Chris Reilly, and I am a summer intern and Google Policy Fellow here at Public Knowledge.  I am returning to PK after helping with its first World’s Fair Use Day this past January. 

I am a rising second year student at the University of Virginia School of Law.  At UVA, I am the incoming President of the Virginia Society of Law and Technology and an Articles Editor of the Virginia Journal of Law and Technology.  A fascination with the challenging issues at the intersection of law and technology is what drove me to law school, so I am very excited to be working on these issues at PK this summer.

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Blog

Intern reporting in

May 26, 2010

Hello, I’m Mart Kuhn and though I’ve been here at Public Knowledge for a while, we haven’t been properly introduced yet. I just wrapped up my second year at the George Washington University Law School, and I’m happy to be back at PK full-time for the summer after interning a few days a week this past spring. Hopefully things will be a bit less hectic now that I don’t have a full courseload of other work competing for my attention. (Though judging by the week that just zoomed by, it may if anything be even more hectic.)

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Hello, all!  My name is Jodie Graham and I’m one of the legal interns who have recently descended upon the Public Knowledge office.  I am going into my third year at the George Washington University Law School here in DC, where public interest law and intellectual property have both grabbed my attention.  I used to work in music, doing everything from performance to writing to recording engineering to club concert production to musicology research, which I think is actually a pretty routine amalgam of jobs for the music business.  A serendipitous undergrad copyright law class lured me away into the legal world.

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The Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA) is a complex and highly controversial statute, and the anti-circumvention provisions in section 1201 are some of its most complex and controversial components. Despite more than a decade’s worth of judicial interpretation, there remain plenty of unsettled questions about just what constitutes circumvention and just what constitutes a protected technological measure. And what we do know for sure makes a strong case that the anti-circumvention provisions are overbroad and have significant and harmful unintended consequences.

Yet the Senate is considering a bill that could significantly ramp up enforcement of section 1201 and exacerbate those unintended consequences. Among other things, the bill would give US Customs and Border Protection (CBP) the authority to decide for itself whether merchandise is a prohibited circumvention device, and thus to seize the merchandise at the border.

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Gigi Sohn, President of Public Knowledge, debated impact of the news that the FCC is moving towards classifying broadband Internet Access under Title II yesterday on TechCrunchTV.  In addition to the moderator Andrew Keen, She faced off against ITIF’s Richard Bennett, Stanford Law School’s Larry Downes, and Techdirt’s Mike Masnick.

 

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In a significant shift from its past position, the U.S. government yesterday expressed its willingness to consider a treaty on limitations and exceptions to copyright for the benefit of the blind, visually impaired, and other reading disabled persons as one of the options to address problems faced by this community. The statement was made on the second day of deliberations at the Standing Committee on Copyrights and Related Rights (SCCR), of WIPO at its ongoing 19th session. The delegations of Brazil, Ecuador, and Paraguay had introduced a treaty proposal in May this year at the SCCR’s 18th session. As I reported then, the U.S. government had avoided taking any position on the treaty, contending that copyright was just one hurdle facing the blind and there were many other issues that needed to be solved.

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On the eve of the FCC's upcoming Network Neutrality rulemaking, Canada has now settled its definition of "reasonable network management" and set rules for traffic throttling. Amazingly, the rules the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) settled on for "reasonable network management" look a lot like the standard our own FCC settled on in the Comcast/BitTorrent Order, but even stronger on the notice and transparency side. Hopefully, the FCC is paying attention here as it considers its own rulemaking on the definition of "reasonable network management."

You can read the CRTC press release here and the detailed order here.

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