Posts by Rashmi Rangnath:

Countries agree on historic treaty to increase access to books for the blind.


Late yesterday night, countries gathered at Marrakesh, Morocco, agreed on a treaty designed to promote greater access to books for the blind and other visually impaired persons. As many have explained, currently, the blind have access to less than 5% of printed material in most parts of the world and this treaty is designed to change that situation. Representatives of the blind, public interest organizations, and library groups working on this treaty have expressed their happiness with the text.

Here is a quick summary of how the treaty could increase access to books for the blind:

Read More

Dear USTR, copyright has meaningful non-economic and social value; keep it out of the U.S.-E.U. Free Trade Agreement. If you have to have it, make sure it protects all Americans and not just large content owners. (And make the agreement transparent and inclusive while you’re at it.)


Today we filed comments about the proposed United States-European Union Free Trade Agreement – the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP). We told the Office of the United States Trade Representative (USTR) that copyright is an uncomfortable fit for a trade agreement and should be kept out of the TTIP.

If the USTR still wants to include copyright within the TTIP, it should make sure that a copyright chapter in the TTIP will not impede Congress’s ability to change U.S. copyright laws.

We also asked the USTR to break from the past and not negotiate the TTIP in secret.

Read More

Among the many valuable collections that the Library of Congress holds is a vast collection of old newspapers. The Library explains (page 16) that digitizing these collections can provide new and efficient tools for researchers. These newspapers offer a wealth of information on topics such as “the Great Depression, American perspectives on the rise of Hitler and World War II, post-World War I and immigrant communities in America, the assassination of President John F. Kennedy, community views on the Civil Rights Act of 1968, to name a few.” These newspapers and scores of other works cannot be publicly disseminated without permission from their copyright owners, who are often unlocatable. These works are called orphan works. The Copyright Office is conducting an inquiry into possible solutions to the problem of orphan works.

Read More

Exclusive rights conferred by intellectual property laws can conflict with human rights. Yet policy makers rarely acknowledge this possibility and continue to make IP rules that increase the scope of exclusive rights. In a recent decision the European Court of Human Rights (ECHR) disagreed, recognizing that copyright laws can have an adverse impact on the freedom of expression. Scholars point out that the court is likely to hear more such cases in future.

Read More

This past Friday, we filed comments in the Special 301 process, the Office of the United States Trade Representative’s (USTR) annual exercise of naming countries that do not adequately protect intellectual property interests of Americans. We believe that this process has turned into an exercise of pressuring countries to pass copyright laws that provide maximum benefits to rights holders, preventing many social, economic, and political benefits that flow from sensible limits on copyright owner rights.

Read More

No posts by this author.

Posts by Rashmi Rangnath:

Countries agree on historic treaty to increase access to books for the blind.


Late yesterday night, countries gathered at Marrakesh, Morocco, agreed on a treaty designed to promote greater access to books for the blind and other visually impaired persons. As many have explained, currently, the blind have access to less than 5% of printed material in most parts of the world and this treaty is designed to change that situation. Representatives of the blind, public interest organizations, and library groups working on this treaty have expressed their happiness with the text.

Here is a quick summary of how the treaty could increase access to books for the blind:

Read More

Dear USTR, copyright has meaningful non-economic and social value; keep it out of the U.S.-E.U. Free Trade Agreement. If you have to have it, make sure it protects all Americans and not just large content owners. (And make the agreement transparent and inclusive while you’re at it.)


Today we filed comments about the proposed United States-European Union Free Trade Agreement – the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP). We told the Office of the United States Trade Representative (USTR) that copyright is an uncomfortable fit for a trade agreement and should be kept out of the TTIP.

If the USTR still wants to include copyright within the TTIP, it should make sure that a copyright chapter in the TTIP will not impede Congress’s ability to change U.S. copyright laws.

We also asked the USTR to break from the past and not negotiate the TTIP in secret.

Read More

Among the many valuable collections that the Library of Congress holds is a vast collection of old newspapers. The Library explains (page 16) that digitizing these collections can provide new and efficient tools for researchers. These newspapers offer a wealth of information on topics such as “the Great Depression, American perspectives on the rise of Hitler and World War II, post-World War I and immigrant communities in America, the assassination of President John F. Kennedy, community views on the Civil Rights Act of 1968, to name a few.” These newspapers and scores of other works cannot be publicly disseminated without permission from their copyright owners, who are often unlocatable. These works are called orphan works. The Copyright Office is conducting an inquiry into possible solutions to the problem of orphan works.

Read More

Exclusive rights conferred by intellectual property laws can conflict with human rights. Yet policy makers rarely acknowledge this possibility and continue to make IP rules that increase the scope of exclusive rights. In a recent decision the European Court of Human Rights (ECHR) disagreed, recognizing that copyright laws can have an adverse impact on the freedom of expression. Scholars point out that the court is likely to hear more such cases in future.

Read More

This past Friday, we filed comments in the Special 301 process, the Office of the United States Trade Representative’s (USTR) annual exercise of naming countries that do not adequately protect intellectual property interests of Americans. We believe that this process has turned into an exercise of pressuring countries to pass copyright laws that provide maximum benefits to rights holders, preventing many social, economic, and political benefits that flow from sensible limits on copyright owner rights.

Read More

No posts by this author.

Posts by Rashmi Rangnath:

Countries agree on historic treaty to increase access to books for the blind.


Late yesterday night, countries gathered at Marrakesh, Morocco, agreed on a treaty designed to promote greater access to books for the blind and other visually impaired persons. As many have explained, currently, the blind have access to less than 5% of printed material in most parts of the world and this treaty is designed to change that situation. Representatives of the blind, public interest organizations, and library groups working on this treaty have expressed their happiness with the text.

Here is a quick summary of how the treaty could increase access to books for the blind:

Read More

Dear USTR, copyright has meaningful non-economic and social value; keep it out of the U.S.-E.U. Free Trade Agreement. If you have to have it, make sure it protects all Americans and not just large content owners. (And make the agreement transparent and inclusive while you’re at it.)


Today we filed comments about the proposed United States-European Union Free Trade Agreement – the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP). We told the Office of the United States Trade Representative (USTR) that copyright is an uncomfortable fit for a trade agreement and should be kept out of the TTIP.

If the USTR still wants to include copyright within the TTIP, it should make sure that a copyright chapter in the TTIP will not impede Congress’s ability to change U.S. copyright laws.

We also asked the USTR to break from the past and not negotiate the TTIP in secret.

Read More

Among the many valuable collections that the Library of Congress holds is a vast collection of old newspapers. The Library explains (page 16) that digitizing these collections can provide new and efficient tools for researchers. These newspapers offer a wealth of information on topics such as “the Great Depression, American perspectives on the rise of Hitler and World War II, post-World War I and immigrant communities in America, the assassination of President John F. Kennedy, community views on the Civil Rights Act of 1968, to name a few.” These newspapers and scores of other works cannot be publicly disseminated without permission from their copyright owners, who are often unlocatable. These works are called orphan works. The Copyright Office is conducting an inquiry into possible solutions to the problem of orphan works.

Read More

Exclusive rights conferred by intellectual property laws can conflict with human rights. Yet policy makers rarely acknowledge this possibility and continue to make IP rules that increase the scope of exclusive rights. In a recent decision the European Court of Human Rights (ECHR) disagreed, recognizing that copyright laws can have an adverse impact on the freedom of expression. Scholars point out that the court is likely to hear more such cases in future.

Read More

This past Friday, we filed comments in the Special 301 process, the Office of the United States Trade Representative’s (USTR) annual exercise of naming countries that do not adequately protect intellectual property interests of Americans. We believe that this process has turned into an exercise of pressuring countries to pass copyright laws that provide maximum benefits to rights holders, preventing many social, economic, and political benefits that flow from sensible limits on copyright owner rights.

Read More

No posts by this author.

Posts by Rashmi Rangnath:

Countries agree on historic treaty to increase access to books for the blind.


Late yesterday night, countries gathered at Marrakesh, Morocco, agreed on a treaty designed to promote greater access to books for the blind and other visually impaired persons. As many have explained, currently, the blind have access to less than 5% of printed material in most parts of the world and this treaty is designed to change that situation. Representatives of the blind, public interest organizations, and library groups working on this treaty have expressed their happiness with the text.

Here is a quick summary of how the treaty could increase access to books for the blind:

Read More

Dear USTR, copyright has meaningful non-economic and social value; keep it out of the U.S.-E.U. Free Trade Agreement. If you have to have it, make sure it protects all Americans and not just large content owners. (And make the agreement transparent and inclusive while you’re at it.)


Today we filed comments about the proposed United States-European Union Free Trade Agreement – the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP). We told the Office of the United States Trade Representative (USTR) that copyright is an uncomfortable fit for a trade agreement and should be kept out of the TTIP.

If the USTR still wants to include copyright within the TTIP, it should make sure that a copyright chapter in the TTIP will not impede Congress’s ability to change U.S. copyright laws.

We also asked the USTR to break from the past and not negotiate the TTIP in secret.

Read More

Among the many valuable collections that the Library of Congress holds is a vast collection of old newspapers. The Library explains (page 16) that digitizing these collections can provide new and efficient tools for researchers. These newspapers offer a wealth of information on topics such as “the Great Depression, American perspectives on the rise of Hitler and World War II, post-World War I and immigrant communities in America, the assassination of President John F. Kennedy, community views on the Civil Rights Act of 1968, to name a few.” These newspapers and scores of other works cannot be publicly disseminated without permission from their copyright owners, who are often unlocatable. These works are called orphan works. The Copyright Office is conducting an inquiry into possible solutions to the problem of orphan works.

Read More

Exclusive rights conferred by intellectual property laws can conflict with human rights. Yet policy makers rarely acknowledge this possibility and continue to make IP rules that increase the scope of exclusive rights. In a recent decision the European Court of Human Rights (ECHR) disagreed, recognizing that copyright laws can have an adverse impact on the freedom of expression. Scholars point out that the court is likely to hear more such cases in future.

Read More

This past Friday, we filed comments in the Special 301 process, the Office of the United States Trade Representative’s (USTR) annual exercise of naming countries that do not adequately protect intellectual property interests of Americans. We believe that this process has turned into an exercise of pressuring countries to pass copyright laws that provide maximum benefits to rights holders, preventing many social, economic, and political benefits that flow from sensible limits on copyright owner rights.

Read More

No posts by this author.

Posts by Rashmi Rangnath:

Countries agree on historic treaty to increase access to books for the blind.


Late yesterday night, countries gathered at Marrakesh, Morocco, agreed on a treaty designed to promote greater access to books for the blind and other visually impaired persons. As many have explained, currently, the blind have access to less than 5% of printed material in most parts of the world and this treaty is designed to change that situation. Representatives of the blind, public interest organizations, and library groups working on this treaty have expressed their happiness with the text.

Here is a quick summary of how the treaty could increase access to books for the blind:

Read More

Dear USTR, copyright has meaningful non-economic and social value; keep it out of the U.S.-E.U. Free Trade Agreement. If you have to have it, make sure it protects all Americans and not just large content owners. (And make the agreement transparent and inclusive while you’re at it.)


Today we filed comments about the proposed United States-European Union Free Trade Agreement – the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP). We told the Office of the United States Trade Representative (USTR) that copyright is an uncomfortable fit for a trade agreement and should be kept out of the TTIP.

If the USTR still wants to include copyright within the TTIP, it should make sure that a copyright chapter in the TTIP will not impede Congress’s ability to change U.S. copyright laws.

We also asked the USTR to break from the past and not negotiate the TTIP in secret.

Read More

Among the many valuable collections that the Library of Congress holds is a vast collection of old newspapers. The Library explains (page 16) that digitizing these collections can provide new and efficient tools for researchers. These newspapers offer a wealth of information on topics such as “the Great Depression, American perspectives on the rise of Hitler and World War II, post-World War I and immigrant communities in America, the assassination of President John F. Kennedy, community views on the Civil Rights Act of 1968, to name a few.” These newspapers and scores of other works cannot be publicly disseminated without permission from their copyright owners, who are often unlocatable. These works are called orphan works. The Copyright Office is conducting an inquiry into possible solutions to the problem of orphan works.

Read More

Exclusive rights conferred by intellectual property laws can conflict with human rights. Yet policy makers rarely acknowledge this possibility and continue to make IP rules that increase the scope of exclusive rights. In a recent decision the European Court of Human Rights (ECHR) disagreed, recognizing that copyright laws can have an adverse impact on the freedom of expression. Scholars point out that the court is likely to hear more such cases in future.

Read More

This past Friday, we filed comments in the Special 301 process, the Office of the United States Trade Representative’s (USTR) annual exercise of naming countries that do not adequately protect intellectual property interests of Americans. We believe that this process has turned into an exercise of pressuring countries to pass copyright laws that provide maximum benefits to rights holders, preventing many social, economic, and political benefits that flow from sensible limits on copyright owner rights.

Read More

No posts by this author.