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Late last year, while folks were carving up turkeys and shopping for holiday gifts, the Commerce Committees on both sides of Capitol Hill were busy introducing long-awaited privacy legislation. For years now, Public Knowledge has been calling for comprehensive federal privacy legislation to protect our fundamental right to privacy online that includes (among other things) […]

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Last week, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) released its Report and Order about the new Rural Digital Opportunity Fund (RDOF), which provides $20.4 billion to fund broadband deployment in rural areas over 10 years. However, the Order, as written, could actually broaden the digital divide by punishing states that have taken steps to fund broadband […]

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This piece was originally published by the Shorenstein Center on Media, Politics and Public Policy, where Gene Kimmelman is a Senior Fellow. It’s an evolution on the ideas first laid out in Gene’s 2019 piece, “The Right Way to Regulate Digital Platforms.” Both are part of the Digital Platforms & Democracy Project’s efforts to explain and disseminate […]

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beatles in america

The United Kingdom’s Competition and Markets Authority (“CMA”) released its interim report on digital advertising markets in December. The report deserves careful attention by U.S. policymakers and the public. Of course, the findings are “interim,” so they may change as the CMA receives feedback and compiles its final report. (In case you are not inclined […]

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Today is Public Domain Day! Come celebrate with us from 5- 9 pm at American University Washington College of Law. View the program and register here. 2019 was the first year that works protected by the Copyright Extension Act—those created after 1923—entered the public domain. This year we are celebrating all the copyrighted works from […]

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graffiti

In the early fall of 2019, Ryan Williams was driving out of a garage with his wife and child when he was allegedly called a racial epithet by his white neighbor and the neighbor’s daughter. When Williams got out of his car, the neighbor called the police, and as the police arrived, Williams, like many […]

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ticketmaster tickets

A decade ago, the Department of Justice approved the merger of Ticketmaster and Live Nation — combining the biggest concert promoter, a major venue operator and artist manager, and the largest ticket provider under one roof. The anticompetitive implications of this deal were enormous. The combined company would be able to use its relationships with […]

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big tech logos

This piece was originally published in The Seattle Times. You can view it here on seattletimes.com. Local newspapers are experiencing a steady decline in traditional print-advertising revenue as technology giants like Google and Facebook profit from the digital ads that support their massive information distribution platforms. It’s no wonder that the major media association has […]

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ces logo

Last week I went to CES, the tech industry’s annual conference where they show off cool new products, prototypes, and ideas of what’s next in tech. (I also presented on a panel, “Should Big Tech Be Broken Up?,” which you can watch here.) I approached vendors with a policy advocate eye, and did a lot […]

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Copyright, Fair Use, and Competition in Oracle v. Google

January 13, 2020
code

The ongoing Oracle v. Google case is headed to the Supreme Court, and we submitted an amicus brief in support of Google today.  As a recap — Oracle sued Google in 2010, accusing the tech giant of copying over 11000 lines of code from Oracle’s Java programming language application programming interface (API). Google deployed the […]

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