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No Spending for Flag

September 20, 2005 Blog Posts, Broadcast Flag, Policy Blog

When we last mentioned the broadcast flag…you’ll remember that PK along with the EFF asked you to call into Senate Appropriators to make sure they didn’t do anything with the broadcast flag behind closed doors. Specifically, we were concerned that the Senate Appropriations Committee would authorize the FCC to instate the broadcast flag scheme. That bill, the CJS Appropriations bill H.R. 2862 (a bill that sets out spending for the Departments of Commerce, Justice, and State) passed the Committee and headed to the Senate floor for amendments and final passage.

At the end of last week, a number of amendments were made to H.R. 2862. On the floor, there’s no real telling what might happen. There’s very little process and occasionally, “non-germaine” amendments (read: unrelated amendments that really have no business being included on a bill) get attached.

Well, the bill passed the Senate on Thursday, but it has taken some time to find out exactly what the amendments actually said. After having gone through the bill and amendments, we can say that we’ve all dodged another bullet and the CJS Appropriations Bill is Broadcast Flag free!

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Getting real about the Grokster case

February 8, 2005 News, News & Analysis, P2P

Over the next few months, the Supreme Court and--likely--Congress will resume a debate over rules that could determine whether consumers will continue to enjoy the benefits of many of the gadgets CNET covers.

The debate is specifically about what kind of legal liability--if any--technology manufacturers, financiers, Internet service providers, journalists and others should have if their actions "induce" another to commit copyright infringement.

By: Gigi Sohn, CNET News.com
Link

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For Immediate Release

Background: The Senate late in its weekend session passed by unanimous consent S 3021, a shorter version of the omnibus copyright legislation (HR 2391) that had been introduced earlier in the session.

Statement of Gigi B. Sohn, president of Public Knowledge:

Consumers won a major victory when the Senate passed legislation removing the most egregious elements of the omnibus copyright bill that had previously been under consideration. We strongly support the version of the Family Movie Act, included in the bill, which gives families more control over how they watch movies and television, preserving the right to skip over commercials. The bill will benefit consumers, both in their entertainment choices now, and from the innovation in technology that will result in coming years.

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While enforcing the Copyright Act and preventing copyright infringement are worthy goals, Representative Berman's Peer-to-Peer Self-Help bill goes too far. Rep. Berman's bill gives the content industry great latitude to engage in harmful behavior that could affect lawful consumer activities, as well as unlawful behavior.

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