Press Release

Public Knowledge Files Opposition to Petitions for Reconsideration in 5G Spectrum Frontiers

February 1, 2017 , , ,

Yesterday, Public Knowledge and New America’s Open Technology Institute filed an Opposition to Petitions for Reconsideration of the Federal Communications Commission’s 5G Spectrum Frontiers Order adopted in 2016. We seek to preserve important elements of the Spectrum Frontiers Order, including spectrum sharing in the 37-37.6 GHz band, a substantial allocation of unlicensed spectrum for next-generation Wi-Fi and other innovative new services, and a straightforward reporting requirement to help educate the Commission about cybersecurity efforts undertaken by network operators.

The following can be attributed to John Gasparini, Policy Fellow at Public Knowledge:

“The Commission engaged in a thorough and deliberate process in crafting the 2016 Spectrum Frontiers Order. Efforts to overturn the Order represent little more than a sour-grapes attempt to revisit and relitigate already-resolved issues. Changes to the Order proposed by the Petitioners are contrary to the public interest, and would reduce public access to spectrum, compromise public safety, and impede innovation.

“In particular, the Commission made great strides in promoting the public interest through increased access to spectrum. Spectrum sharing in the 37-37.6 GHz band, and the unlicensed allocation in the 64-71 GHz band should not be abandoned, as major network operators seek in their Petitions. Broad access to these bands will enable competitors, consumers, and communities to access spectrum to deploy 5G services in those areas not rapidly served by major providers, or even to self-provision complementary or alternative high-bandwidth networks.

“The Commission also acted to promote network security by asking that network operators inform the Commission as to the steps they take to protect their networks and users. It is critical that 21st century networks be built to combat 21st century threats — the Commission’s action ensures it has the necessary information to be assured that network operators are taking security issues seriously.”

You may read the opposition here.