Items tagged "3D Printing"

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Licensing Your 3D Printed Stuff: A 3D Printing Whitepaper

March 10, 2015 3D Printing , Intellectual Property , Licensing , Whitepaper

Today we’re happy to announce our newest 3D printing whitepaper Licensing Your 3D Printed Stuff. Today’s paper follows in the footsteps of 2010’s It Will Be Awesome If They Don’t Screw It Up: 3D Printing, Intellectual Property, and the Next Great Disruptive Technology and 2013’s What’s the Deal with Copyright and 3D Printing?. Like the previous papers, Licensing Your 3D Printed Stuff examines the intersection between 3D printing and intellectual property. However, Licensing Your 3D Printed Stuff takes a more practical, application-based approach to the problems.

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3D/DC is Back – 3D Printers are Coming to DC April 29!

March 3, 2015 3D Printing , 3DDC

We are excited to announce that the world of 3D printing is coming back to Washington, DC this spring. On April 29th we will be holding 3D/DC 2015, our fourth (mostly) annual bacchanalia of 3D printing and policy. If we do say so ourselves, this is the premiere 3D printing policy event of the year, bringing together the 3D printing world and the world of policy. You should come.

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Telling the Copyright Office to Remove Digital Locks

February 6, 2015 1201 Reform , 3D Printing , Anticircumvention , Copyright Reform

Today Public Knowledge filed a slew of comments with the Copyright Office. As we described earlier, part of the Digital Millennium Copyright Act makes it illegal for anyone to break digital locks placed on copyrighted material – even if their eventual use of the material is perfectly legal. Fortunately, every three years the Library of Congress (with the help of the Copyright Office) is required to grant exemptions to this law for cases where the law is interfering with otherwise legal and beneficial activities.

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Tell the Copyright Office to Remove These Digital Locks!

January 27, 2015 1201 Reform , 3D Printing , Anticircumvention , Copyright Reform

Every three years, we have a particular chance to change the law. Part of the Digital Millennium Copyright Act makes it illegal for anyone to break digital locks placed on copyrighted material—even if their eventual use of the material is perfectly legal.

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Doubling Down on Copyfraud: You Don’t Need Permission to 3D Scan 500 Year Old Sculptures

January 27, 2015 3D Printing , Copyright Reform , Public Domain

Last week, we wrote about Augustana College (SD)’s demand that 3D scans of its copy of Michelangelo’s Moses be taken down from the internet. To justify this request, Augustana cited vague (and, it should be noted, nonexistent) copyright concerns. As a result of its ridiculous assertion of a copyright interest in a copy of a 500-year-old sculpture, Augustana deprived the public of 3D scans of this public domain work.

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Stratasys Drops One Patent from Its Lawsuit Against Afinia

August 7, 2014 3D Printing , Patent Reform

As you may recall, back in November Stratasys (the company that owns MakerBot) sued Microboards Technology, LLC (the company that makes the Afinia desktop 3D printer) for patent infringement. Specifically, Stratasys accused Afinia of violating four of its patents.

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PK In The Know Podcast: Government Shutdown, Patent Reform, and 3D Scanning

October 4, 2013 3D Printing , Government 2.0

On this week's podcast we recap the government shutdown, 3D Scanning, and patents.
Listen to Podcast

Subscribe to the podcast on iTunes here.
Subscribe to the podcast via the .xml here.
Click here to download the file for this week’s podcast directly.

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Getty Shows What it Means to be a Modern Museum

August 15, 2013 3D Printing , Copyright

Making public domain works available in a public domain way respects copyright and spreads culture. 


Yesterday’s news from the Getty Museum that they were making high-resolution images of 4,600 works in their collection available for free download should be celebrated by anyone who cares about art and culture. And it should also be celebrated by anyone who cares about copyright and the public domain, and who is thinking about what it means to be a modern museum dedicated to bringing people into contact with art.

Let’s get the art and culture part out of the way first.  One of the great things about museums is that they allow people who are not, say, massively rich oil magnates to access culture. And one of the great things about the internet is that they allow people who are not physically near something to experience it themselves. Combining the two makes all sorts of sense.

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3D Printed Copyright Infringement is Still Copyright Infringement

June 19, 2013 3D Printing , Copyright

A Creative Commons license on a 3D printed sculpture does not mean that you can print it however you want.


The past few days have seen an increase in complaints by 3D printing designers about how companies that manufacture 3D printers use their designs.  It raises questions about how copyright works in the world of 3D printing, and what it means to release designs under a Creative Commons license.

Copyright Still Exists in 3D Printing

One of the things that makes 3D printing so interesting is that, especially when compared to the world of music and movies, lots of 3D printed objects are not protected by copyright (or any type of intellectual property right) at all.  However, the fact that many 3D printed things are not protected by copyright does not mean that all 3D printed things are not protected by copyright. 

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Thanks to 3D Printing and Open Source Hardware, Patent May be on the Cusp of a Copyright Moment

May 30, 2013 3D Printing , Patent

A new wave of creators care about innovating. They care about building things. And they mostly see patents as getting in the way.


If you are a practicing patent attorney, it might be a good idea to call up that one copyright attorney you know and invite them out for some coffee.  Because it’s starting to look like patents are about to have a copyright-like moment where they get pulled from an esoteric corner of law and thrust into popular culture.

And this isn’t a post about software patents, or about the portable patent thicket that is a modern mobile phone.  No, this is a post about what happens when an entire chunk of society runs into an area of law and gets really, really annoyed with what they find.

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