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Why Does South Korea Have Faster Internet for a Cheaper Price Tag?

The average South Korean can choose between three major private internet providers –SKT, KT and LG U+ – and pay less than $30 a month for the fastest internet in the world. That’s $17 less than what the average American pays for a much slower internet hookup. But why? How is it possible that the citizens of the last developed democracy have a faster and more affordable internet than Americans? The simple answer to this question is that in the 1990s South Koreans decided that their country needed a fast and affordable internet provided by a vibrant private sector, and there was the political willingness, and a national plan, to achieve that goal.

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Podcast

PK In The Know Podcast: Charter/Time Warner Cable Merger and Blizzard World of Warcraft Lawsuit

PK In The Know Podcast: Charter/Time Warner Cable Merger and Blizzard World of Warcraft Lawsuit

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Podcast

PK In The Know Podcast: Broadband Access and the Lifeline Program

PK In The Know Podcast: Broadband Access and the Lifeline Program

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A Perfect Match: Title II Will Make Senator Thune’s Rural Broadband Goals A Reality

For nearly all Americans, broadband is an indispensable service that makes it possible for them to communicate, transact commerce, and participate in civic life. In fact, broadband is so critical that last month Senator Thune, chairman of the Senate Commerce Committee and a bipartisan group of 60 senators, called on the Federal Communications Commission (FCC or Commission) to ensure that rural Americans have access to high-speed broadband.

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The Other Reclassification: FCC Action on MVPDs Could Increase Online Video Competition

You may be forgiven if, given all the attention given to the FCC’s decision to classify broadband as “telecommunications” under Title II of the Communications Act, you missed that the FCC was also considering another “reclassification,” of a sort. Specifically, the FCC is considering allowing online services to operate as “multichannel video programming distributors,” an action that could benefit consumers and competition by opening up the video marketplace to new entrants, and paving the way for online services to offer the same kinds of channels that are available today only through traditional pay-TV services like cable and satellite. Yesterday, Public Knowledge filed comments supporting the FCC’s proposed action, which could increase consumer choice while bringing down prices without subjecting most kinds of online video services to additional regulation.

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