Entries Matching: Kirtsaeng

What the Election Means for the Internet

After nearly two years of debates, never-ending commercials, donation solicitations and ever-present polling, Election Day is over and the results are in.  As many had predicted, the balance of government has not changed significantly.  Democrats will retain the Presidency and control of the Senate, and Republicans will continue to control the House, albeit by a slightly smaller margin than before.

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Impressions from Today’s Oral Argument in Kirtsaeng

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I was able to attend oral arguments this morning at the Supreme Court, which included Kirtsaeng v. John Wiley & Sons, Inc. For some background on the case, see the resources linked at this blog post.

There were three separate theories of section 109's interpretation in the Court today: Kirtsaeng's, made by Josh Rosenkranz; Wiley's, made by Ted Olson, and the U.S. Government's made by Deputy Solicitor General Malcolm Stewart. Kirtsaeng's position is that "lawfully made under this title" means "made lawfully," and that to judge what "lawfully" means, we look to the standards of title 17.

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First Sale at the Supreme Court: Kirtsaeng

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Today, the Supreme Court will be hearing arguments in Kirtsaeng v. John Wiley & Sons, Inc., a case that could decide whether or not you fully own your own books, CDs, DVDs, and all your other things that contain copyrighted works—particularly if they were made outside the US.

Recordings of the oral arguments should be posted later in the week. In the meantime, if you’re looking for some background on the case, see Jodie's post here, or read on below.

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Public Knowledge Urges Supreme Court to Preserve First Sale

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Today, Public Knowledge filed a public interest amicus brief in the Supreme Court case of Kirtsaeng v. Wiley & Sons, Inc., a dispute that has the potential to drastically alter users’ property rights in their own copies of books, movies, music, software—in fact, any copyrighted material. The case began with a Thai student studying in the United States who realized that international editions of textbooks cost significantly less than the U.S. editions. He then imported international editions and resold them. Wiley & Sons sued under the theory that these sales violated their exclusive distribution rights.

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