Entries Matching: MVPD

The Other Reclassification: FCC Action on MVPDs Could Increase Online Video Competition

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You may be forgiven if, given all the attention given to the FCC's decision to classify broadband as "telecommunications" under Title II of the Communications Act, you missed that the FCC was also considering another "reclassification," of a sort. Specifically, the FCC is considering allowing online services to operate as "multichannel video programming distributors," an action that could benefit consumers and competition by opening up the video marketplace to new entrants, and paving the way for online services to offer the same kinds of channels that are available today only through traditional pay-TV services like cable and satellite. Yesterday, Public Knowledge filed comments supporting the FCC's proposed action, which could increase consumer choice while bringing down prices without subjecting most kinds of online video services to additional regulation.

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Public Knowledge Applauds FCC for Advancing Competitive Protections for Online Video

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Today, the Federal Communications Commission tentatively concluded that online services qualify as "multichannel programming distributors" and asked for further public input on some technical issues. The FCC's legal conclusion means that certain online services will qualify for competitive protections, among other things.

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FCC General Counsel Outlines Path to Improving Video Competition

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Today, FCC General Counsel Jonathan Sallet gave a speech at the Duke Law Center for Innovation Policy Conference providing some details about the FCC's approach to video competition. The speech indicated that the FCC is considering recognizing that online video services can be "multichannel video programming distributors," like cable and satellite TV, under the Communications Act.

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More Reports of Technology Giants Interested in Internet TV Show That the Problem Isn’t Technology

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Technology isn't holding back Internet TV—the structure of the media industry is.


Rumors of Intel's and Apple's interest in launching some kind of online cable service have been circulating for months. Years, even. It's clear that major tech companies have the technology ready, and they've been making phone calls and taking meetings. People talk, reports get written. Now, we can add Google to the mix. As the Wall Street Journal first reported, it's interested in launching some kind of online TV service, too—one that is intended to actually substitute for a traditional pay TV subscription by having current, popular shows from both cable and broadcast channels, and not just supplement it with on-demand access to a back catalog or user-generated content.

So with all these rumors, and all these giant tech companies involved, why haven't we actually seen a service get launched? The technology's ready. Other countries already have online cable TV--Sweden's Magine, a company that outright says "We’re meaning to replace your cable network," is expanding internationally. Why doesn't the US?

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