Entries Matching: Privacy

White House Releases VEP Charter, Increases Transparency of Cybersecurity Disclosures

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Today the White House released the Vulnerabilities Equities Policy and Process (VEP) Charter. The Charter establishes a Vulnerabilities Equities Review Board to oversee the government’s disclosure of vulnerabilities that are not publicly known in information technology products and systems. Public Knowledge commends the government for increasing the transparency of its approach to disclosing hardware and software vulnerabilities.

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Public Knowledge Commends Sen. Leahy for Consumer Privacy Protection Act of 2017

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Today, Senator Patrick Leahy (D-VT) introduced the Consumer Privacy Protection Act of 2017. The bill would place requirements on companies with sensitive consumer information, such as Equifax, to maintain safeguards to ensure the privacy and security of such data, and to notify consumers when that sensitive data is breached. Public Knowledge applauds Senator Leahy and the bill’s co-sponsors, including Senators Markey, Blumenthal, Wyden, Franken, Baldwin, and Harris for prioritizing consumer privacy in the wake of the Equifax security breach.

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Public Knowledge Urges UN Agency to Avoid Limiting Free Speech, Open Internet in Privacy Discussions

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Today, Public Knowledge signs a joint statement with Access Now and ARTICLE 19 on privacy policy discussions taking place at the World Telecommunication Development Conference (WTDC) in Buenos Aires, Argentina. The WTDC, as part of the International Telecommunication Union (ITU) at the United Nations, outlines the strategies and objectives for the global development of information and communications technologies.

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Members of Congress Tackle Consumer Protection Failures from Equifax Breach

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Last week, Congress held four hearings to investigate the Equifax data breach, which jeopardized the highly sensitive data of 145 millions Americans. The exposed consumer information includes social security numbers, prior addresses, student loans, credit card numbers, and other pieces of private data compiled into credit reports that determine if a consumer qualifies for employment, loans, or new lines of credit. For days, members of Congress questioned former Equifax CEO Richard Smith as to how the breach could have occurred and what steps the company was taking to protect consumers. Mr. Smith resigned in September after the extent of the breach was fully disclosed. During the hearings, he offered little in terms of solutions on how to protect consumers going forward, but his answers revealed significant problems with our current data security regime that Congress must address.

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Waive Goodbye to Your Rights: Equifax and Corporate America’s Love Affair with Forced Arbitration

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This past week, Congress demanded answers from former Equifax CEO Richard Smith about what, exactly, went so terribly wrong in his company’s handling of its massive data breach this summer, and to ask how to keep something like this from happening again. Over the course of four hearings in both the Senate and the House, it became clear that the list of "wrongs" is lengthy. But one of the most damning revelations emerged in the aftermath of the breach in the company’s attempts to mitigate harm post-breach. To be clear, we’re not talking about mitigating consumer harm - we’re talking about Equifax protecting itself from accountability through the use of forced arbitration.

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