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ITU’s Plenipot: What Happened

November 28, 2018 Cybersecurity , Internet Governance , ITU , Plenipot , Privacy

The International Telecommunication Union (ITU) is a United Nations (UN) agency originally created in 1865 to manage cross-national telegraphic communications, and is increasingly seen by its member states as the technology policy branch of the UN system. While to date it is formally responsible only for telecommunications issues, in recent years the ITU has hosted a global summit on Artificial Intelligence (AI), organized a workshop on e-payments and 5G, held a forum on the Internet of Things and Smart Cities, studied the economic impact of the so-called Over-The-Top (OTT) internet services such as WhatsApp or YouTube, developed a global cybersecurity index, and analyzed privacy in cloud computing. That, on top of ITU’s fundamental mandate and ongoing work to help connect the hundreds of millions who are still unconnected.

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Google Plus Demonstrates We Can’t Trust Companies to Do the Right Thing

October 15, 2018 Data Privacy , Data Security , Google Plus , Privacy

Last March, Google discovered a Google Plus bug that permitted developers to access as many as 500,000 Google Plus users’ private information – but didn’t tell anyone.

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Is California’s New Privacy Law Right for the United States?

July 16, 2018 California , Consumer Privacy , Data Protection , Legislation , Privacy

At the end of June, California enacted what has been billed as a comprehensive privacy law. By all accounts, it was a rush job, negotiated in a week behind closed doors in a desperate and successful attempt to keep Californians for Consumer Privacy Campaign Chairman Alaistair MacTaggart’s privacy initiative off the November ballot. As sometimes happens, the law’s proponents and a few reporters may have overhyped the legislation – both given its current contents and because many expect it to change before its effective date in January 2020.

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The FTC Must Be Empowered to Protect Our Privacy

June 18, 2018 Cybersecurity , Data Protection , FTC , Legislation , Privacy

Back in 2011, the Federal Trade Commission alleged that Facebook deceived consumers by failing to keep its promises to protect user privacy. The two parties agreed to settle the charges through something called an “agreement containing consent order.” The Commission also signed a consent agreement with Google that same year. The FTC issued a final Decision and Consent Order regarding the Facebook allegations in 2012. (A consent order is an FTC enforcement tool that operates like a legal settlement.) Without admitting to the complaint’s counts, the parties involved signed a document that basically says, “we both agree to enter this agreement to resolve the allegations in the complaint, so now you have to do the following things, and if you fail to do any of them, the FTC is going to impose financial penalties.”

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The European Privacy Law You Haven’t Heard Of

June 15, 2018 Data Protection , European Union , GRPR , Privacy

The GDPR entered into force late last month, but that doesn’t mean the European Union’s mission to protect online privacy has stopped.

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