Entries Matching: RIAA

Our Call for Copyright Balance in NAFTA Renegotiations

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Later this month, the U.S., Canada, and Mexico will launch their sixth round of negotiations for the modernization of the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA). Recent news coverage has focused on whether the Trump administration will withdraw from the agreement or not. As civil society continues to be excluded from this process, there is still little information about actual intellectual property proposals, but the position of Public Knowledge remains unchanged: trade agreements must promote a balanced copyright system that serves the public interest.

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I Can Use A Banana to Rob a Bank: Why We Don’t Ban Things Just Because They Can Be Misused

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Earlier this week, YouTube-MP3.org announced that it had received a letter from YouTube essentially asking them to shut down.  YouTube-MP3.org was a site that allowed you to strip audio from a YouTube video and save it as an MP3.  Yesterday, it came to light that CNET had received a similar request from the RIAA to remove software from its popular Download.com site that performed the same purpose.  These requests are dumb.

Software That Downloads YouTube Videos Has Many Legitimate Uses

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Where Are The Record Label Best Practices?

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RapidShare’s recent release of its new best practices for cloud storage service throws into stark relief the lengths to which online platforms will go to avoid the wrath—justified or not—of incumbent content distributors like record labels. As we watch digital distributors adopt “best practices” that go well beyond their legal obligations under copyright law to prevent copyright infringement, one obvious question comes to mind: Where are the record label best practices?

Last week RapidShare announced its new “Responsible Practices for Cloud Storage Services,” in which RapidShare promises to go above and beyond its copyright law obligations to stop infringement—and urges other cloud storage services to do the same.

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ACTA: If You Write A Trade Agreement No One Will Sign, What’s The Point?

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Last summer, with the Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement (ACTA) negotiations stalled for two years because of Hollywood insistence adding all kinds of regulate-the-internet crazy stuff, we gave the US Trade Representative and the industries pushing for ACTA some friendly advice: "Drop the crazy stuff."

Officially, the U.S. government wanted ACTA to stop people from bringing actual counterfeit goods into the country, or marketing actual counterfeit goods abroad. Thats why a lot of industry groups and companies wanted ACTA. Not because of they wanted to regulate the Internet and prop up the traditional business models of the movie and music industries, but to deal with the folks making wharehouses full of fake Louis Vitton bags and knock-off Omega watches.

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