Entries Matching: Trademark

Court holds Public Interest Registry In Contempt For Resolving Counterfeit Domains – Wait, It Can

Try entering “CHEAPNORTHFACECLOTHING.COM” into your browser and see what pops up. Should be nothing. The domain was one of many to be permanently shut down, due to an injunction granted by Judge Alvin K. Hellerstein in the Southern District of New York. The domain, if you didn’t guess by the name, led to a site that sold cheap clothes claiming to be North Face, and was part of a network of counterfeit clothing websites mimicking everything from Polo Ralph Lauren to Nike. In all, the list of literally thousands of seized domains represented the largest counterfeiting ring ever discovered in internet history. OK, now try typing in “CHEAPNORTHFACE.ORG.” As of time of writing, that address leads to an active site.

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3D Printing: Lack of Permissions is a Feature, not a Bug

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The technology site ars technica recently posted a feature story by Peter Hanna asking if 3D printing is, in the words of the headline, “The next Napster?”  While it is encouraging to see more people wrestling with the question of how intellectual property law and policy relate to the emerging technology of 3D printing, the article is full of some unwarranted assumptions that could skew the debate going forward. 

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Settlers of Catan Makes Legal Threats: Can it Back Them Up? (Hint: No)

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In the comments in a recent blog post about 3D printing and intellectual property that focused on the board game Settlers of Catan the comments of someone named Neil caught my eye. 

The original post was about how limited the intellectual property protection for board games was, and ultimately concluded that printing a new 3D board was not an infringement.  It then went on to invite discussion about what this lack of protection should mean going forward.

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Weekly News Roundup

As the Net Neutrality debate brews, PK and others continue push for strengthening the proposal. Our three points of concern are ensuring protections for wireless access to the Internet, preventing paid prioritization, and simplifying the definition of “broadband Internet access service” (to avoid potential loopholes). Senator Al Franken sent a letter to the FCC Friday emphasizing the importance of “significantly strengthen[ing]” the proposal. Also, PK’s head of government relations responded to the mythical the meme that “300 Members of Congress are opposed to Net Neutrality”.

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Trademark Law Doesn’t Allow Companies to Silence Competitors

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Trademark law is a consumer protection law, designed to prevent companies from passing off their products as someone else’s. It doesn’t prevent a company from comparing its products to another company's, it doesn’t prevent resellers from accurately pointing out what products they have for sale, and it doesn’t prevent a company from marketing itself to consumers who have expressed an interest in a competitor’s products by, for example, buying advertising that appears when users search for the name of a competitor’s product. Necessarily, it can’t be used to stop search engines like Google, Bing, and Yahoo from engaging in their common practice of selling the keyword advertising space that enables these kinds of uses.

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