Entries Matching: Unlicensed Frequencies

Rumors of Apple Set-Top Box a Reminder of Thwarted Innovation

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The Wall Street Journal has run two recent reports that describe Apple's plan to roll out a cable set-top box. There have been rumors about this for years. Back in 2007, Steve Jobs showed a level of familiarity with obscure cable technology that would suggest that Apple engineers were looking into this kind of product back then. But Jobs was repelled by the janky technology, and instead, Apple introduced a pure streaming device--the AppleTV--that did not interact with cable TV content. But most of the most valuable content is still available only on cable, or on cable first. Lots of people seem to love the AppleTV, but there's a reason why Apple still describes it as a "hobby."

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Updates and this week’s PK In The Know Podcast: DVD Ripping, Boxee, Spectrum, and the Open Design En

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The PK in the Know podcast has been off for the past few weeks so that we could make technical changes to the back end.  This will result in a better feed, but  unfortunately it also means that the feeds have changed.  Please update your feeds by clicking here to subscribe via iTunes, and clicking here to subscribe via other readers.

But now, on to this week's podcast!

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Sauce for the Goose: An Addendum To My “Auctioning Unlicensed” Post

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Yesterday, I posted why the proposal in the House Republican Spectrum Reform discussion draft makes no sense economically. For those who would argue that it does, I reply: then it ought to run both ways. In every auction, the FCC ought to be required to present two options: the licensed option for individuals and the unlicensed option for "collective" bidding.

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Public Knowledge Applauds FCC Action on ‘White Spaces’

The following statement is attributed to Harold Feld, legal director for Public Knowledge:

“Today’s action by the Federal Communications Commission is a great step forward to providing consumers with an exciting new range of products and services.  White spaces technology, using the gaps between digital TV channels, will be adapted to uses ranging from adding flexibility to laptops and tablet computers, to extending broadband access to underserved people in rural and urban settings.

“We haven’t seen anything like this since the FCC 20 years ago approved the use of what was then thought to be unwanted spectrum and what today is used for wi-fi, and other unlicensed consumer applications.

“Companies are eager to build devices and deploy the technologies.  The FCC’s action is a clear signal to go ahead and get started constructing an exciting part of our future.

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