Items tagged "AT&T"

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Yale School of Management’s Case Study on AT&T/T-Mobile: Lessons for Today

June 10, 2019 Anticompetitive mergers , AT&T , Sprint , StopTmobileSprint , T-Mobile

In 2011, Public Knowledge fought hard against the AT&T/T-Mobile merger, until it was finally called off just nine months after its announcement. The merger, which would have led to higher prices and fewer choices for consumers, faced tremendous opposition. Today, we see many of the same industry talking points for the T-Mobile/Sprint proposed merger: false claims about deployment of next-generation networks, market concentration, pricing, and rural broadband access. So we were glad to see that the Yale School of Management added a section on the AT&T/T-Mobile proposed merger as a case study to its Antitrust Enforcement Data project. The project, featuring a wide range of data, serves as a resource for information and economic analyses on antitrust enforcement.

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AT&T Raises Prices After Merger Approval, Proves DoJ Was Right to Sue

March 13, 2019 AT&T , ATTTime Warner , DOJ , Litigation , Time Warner Cable

In light of AT&T’s decision to raise the prices on DirecTV Now subscribers by $10/month, and to drop channels like MTV, Comedy Central, BET, and BBC America (while adding more AT&T-owned content to the bundle), it’s worth reviewing some of what the telecom giant claimed during the recent trial over its merger with Time Warner:

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In the Aftermath of the AT&T/Time Warner Decision, There’s Still Hope

June 19, 2018 AT&T , ATTTime Warner , Competition , Mergers , Time Warner

Last week was a difficult week for antitrust and consumer rights advocates. On Monday, the net neutrality rules (the ones that kept internet service providers from acting as gatekeepers of the internet) officially went off the books. (We are, of course, fighting to bring them back.) The next day, U.S. District Judge Richard Leon issued a ruling permitting the AT&T/Time Warner mega-merger to proceed, in a lawsuit brought on by the Department of Justice. This ruling was more troubling news for consumers, as well as for the future of online competition.

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Putting the Open Internet Transparency Rule to the Test

August 6, 2014 AT&T , Data Caps , T-Mobile , Transparency , Verizon

Today Public Knowledge sent letters to AT&T, Sprint, T-Mobile, and Verizon as the first step in the process of filing open internet complaints against each of them at the FCC. The letters address violations of the FCC’s transparency requirements, which are the only part of the open internet rules that survived court challenge.

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“IP” Does Not Mean “Fiber,” “Fiber” Does Not Mean “IP” — Clearing Confusion About the Phone Network

February 4, 2013 AT&T , Broadband Authority , FCC , phone transition , Verizon

As regular readers know, I regard the upgrade of the phone system (aka the “public switched telephone network” or “PSTN”) to an all-IP based network as a majorly huge deal. As I’ve explained at length before, this is a huge deal because of a bunch of decisions the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) has made over the years that have fragmented our various policies and regulations about phones into a crazy-quilt of different rules tied sometimes to the technology (IP v. traditional phone (TDM)) and sometimes to the actual medium of transmission (copper v. fiber v. cable v. wireless).

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Five Fundamentals, Values For A New Phone Network

January 29, 2013 AT&T , FCC , phone transition

As we wrote back in November, AT&T’s decision to upgrade its network from tradition phone technology (called “TDM”) to an all Internet protocol (IP) system has enormous implications for every aspect of our voice communication system in the country. To provide the right framework for the transition, Public Knowledge submitted to the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) our proposed “Five Fundamentals” Framework: Service to All Americans, Interconnection and Competition, Consumer Protection, Network Reliability, and Public Safety.

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AT&T and Verizon Double-Dare FCC To Stop Spectrum Consolidation

January 25, 2013 AT&T , Competition , Mobile Communication , Spectrum , Verizon

Rarely do you see companies double-dare the FCC to back up their brave talk about promoting competition. That is, however, what AT&T has just decided to do – with a little help from Verizon. After gobbling a ton of spectrum last year in a series of small transactions, AT&T announced earlier this week it would buy up ATNI, which holds the last shreds of the old Alltel Spectrum. To top this off, Verizon just announced it has selected the purchaser for the 700 MHz spectrum it promised to sell off to get permission to buy the SpectrumCo spectrum. And guess what?

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Shutting Down The Phone System Gets Real: The Implications of AT&T Upgrading To An All IP Network.

November 13, 2012 AT&T , Competition , FCC , Wireline

I believe AT&T’s announcement last week about its plans to upgrade its network and replace its rural copper lines with wireless is the single most important development in telecom since passage of the Telecommunications Act of 1996. It impacts just about every aspect of wireline and wireless policy.

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PK In The Know Podcast: ATT, Facetime, and 2012 Election

November 9, 2012 AT&T , Competition , Fair Use , Future of Video , Open Internet

On this week’s podcast we discuss ATT opening up on Facetime, the future of telephone networks, and, of course, what the election means for the internet.

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Will AT&T Try To Crash the Sprint/SoftBank Party?

October 19, 2012 AT&T , Competition , Spectrum

Yesterday, Sprint moved to acquire a majority stake in Clearwire (CLWR) in advance of SoftBank acquiring a majority stake in Sprint. Despite some earlier speculation that SoftBank might have strategies that don’t include CLWR,  and despite disappointment from investors that Sprint won’t spend the extra bucks to acquire CLWR in its entirety, the move was pretty much expected. One of the main obstacles to Sprint in recent years has been its occasionally testy relationship with CLWR, and difficulties the two companies have had negotiating terms for Sprint’s use of CLWR’s spectrum and network.

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