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Holding AT&T to Account for Blocking FaceTime on iPhones and iPads

September 18, 2012 AT&T , Network Neutrality

When AT&T announced that it was going to block FaceTime, Apple’s video chat application, we pointed out that this was a violation of the FCC’s Open Internet rules, and that AT&T’s attempted defenses fell short. We meant it. Today, with our colleagues at Free Press and the New America Foundation’s Open Technology Institute, we notified AT&T that, if it doesn’t reverse course, we plan to file a formal complaint with the FCC.

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UMG/EMI: The Next Innovation Bottleneck

August 15, 2012 AT&T , Comcast , Competition , Innovation , UMGEMI

While much attention has focused on whether European antitrust regulators will allow the major label Universal to buy one of its competitors, EMI, the proposed merger has also attracted the attention of US antitrust authorities in the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) and Senate. In the US context, this merger bears some important similarities to recent proceedings like the Comcast/NBCU merger and the failed AT&T/T-Mobile merger.

Universal/EMI and AT&T/T-Mobile: Taking Over a Maverick Competitor

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Public Knowledge Disappointed With AT&T Comments on T-Mobile

March 23, 2012 AT&T , Press Release

The following is attributed to Gigi B. Sohn, president and CEO of Public Knowledge:

“It was truly unfortunate that a top AT&T official blamed some layoffs at T-Mobile on the government’s blocking of AT&T’s takeover of its competitor.  T-Mobile started losing customers and distributors when the takeover started.  Their ads and marketing were frozen as the deal dragged on, and customers left.  Now they face getting those customers back and investing in their network. 

“It’s also worth noting that had AT&T won, perhaps ten times as many jobs would have been lost than 1,900 announced today, as AT&T’s history of layoffs after transactions has shown.  If AT&T cared about job loss, they could start replacing many of the tens of thousands of jobs they have eliminated over the last few years.”

 

 

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AT&T’s Plan to Cash in on the App Economy

February 27, 2012 AT&T , Data Caps

AT&T has announced a new scheme that is wholly incompatible with an open Internet and could threaten the vibrant and growing app economy. Its idea is to charge app developers to have the data their apps use exempt from data usage caps, opening up grand new possibilities for double dipping.

App developers have succeeded in bringing value to consumers precisely because the app marketplace has low barriers to entry–a mobile game from EA or productivity app from Apple or Microsoft competes on even terms with software from small companies and one-man shops. AT&T’s plan would give an advantage to deep-pocketed app developers and do serious damage to this innovative sector.

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Public Knowledge Questions AT&T Data Cap Plan

February 27, 2012 AT&T , Data Caps , Press Release

The Wall Street Journal reported this morning that AT&T plans the equivalent of an 800 number for wireless app developers and content providers.  Under the plan, app developers or content providers, not customers, would pay for the data used and the data would not apply to a customer’s data cap.

The story is here.

The following is attributed to Harold Feld, legal director of Public Knowledge:

 “This new plan is unfortunate because it shows how fraudulent the AT&T data cap is, and calls into question the whole rationale of the data caps.  Apparently it has nothing to do with network management.  It’s a tool to get more revenue from developers and customers.

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