Items tagged "Broadband"

Press Release

Public Knowledge Finds Net Neutrality Necessary

February 6, 2006 Broadband , Network Neutrality , News & Analysis , Press Release

Public Knowledge said today that the U.S. economy and society would benefit more from continuing today's open Internet than from having network operators exercise greater control.

In a 58-page paper, "Good Fences Make Bad Broadband: Preserving the Internet Through Net Neutrality," Public Knowledge said, "In short, open broadband networks are vitally important to our society, our future economic growth, our high-tech manufacturing sector, and our First Amendment rights to information free of censorship and control. Even if an openness policy imposes some slight burden on network operators, these microeconomic concerns pale in comparison to the macroeconomic benefits of maintaining an open Internet to the society and the economy at large."

Read More
Press Release

Public Knowledge Statement Regarding NCTA v BrandX Internet

June 27, 2005 Broadband , Press Release

For Immediate Release

The following statement is from Gigi B. Sohn, president of Public Knowledge, on the NCTA v BrandX Internet decision today:

The Court's decision today in the Brand X case raises the question of whether Congress, in tackling its next revision of the Telecommunications Act, should act to ensure that communications, content, and applications are allowed to pass freely over the Internet's broadband pipes. We believe Congress should do so, because 'net neutrality' is a worthy goal that not only will promote free speech and creativity on the Internet, but also will benefit those who provide broadband connectivity by making that connectivity more valuable.

Read More
Post

Why Does South Korea Have Faster Internet for a Cheaper Price Tag?

July 19, 2017 Broadband , Broadband Access , Competition , Connectivity , International

The average South Korean can choose between three major private internet providers –SKT, KT and LG U+ – and pay less than $30 a month for the fastest internet in the world. That’s $17 less than what the average American pays for a much slower internet hookup. But why? How is it possible that the citizens of the last developed democracy have a faster and more affordable internet than Americans? The simple answer to this question is that in the 1990s South Koreans decided that their country needed a fast and affordable internet provided by a vibrant private sector, and there was the political willingness, and a national plan, to achieve that goal.

Read More
Post

A Perfect Match: Title II Will Make Senator Thune’s Rural Broadband Goals A Reality

June 10, 2015 Broadband , FCC , Rural Broadband , Title II , Universal Service

For nearly all Americans, broadband is an indispensable service that makes it possible for them to communicate, transact commerce, and participate in civic life. In fact, broadband is so critical that last month Senator Thune, chairman of the Senate Commerce Committee and a bipartisan group of 60 senators, called on the Federal Communications Commission (FCC or Commission) to ensure that rural Americans have access to high-speed broadband.

Read More
Post

The Other Reclassification: FCC Action on MVPDs Could Increase Online Video Competition

March 4, 2015 Broadband , Competition , FCC , MVPD

You may be forgiven if, given all the attention given to the FCC’s decision to classify broadband as “telecommunications” under Title II of the Communications Act, you missed that the FCC was also considering another “reclassification,” of a sort. Specifically, the FCC is considering allowing online services to operate as “multichannel video programming distributors,” an action that could benefit consumers and competition by opening up the video marketplace to new entrants, and paving the way for online services to offer the same kinds of channels that are available today only through traditional pay-TV services like cable and satellite. Yesterday, Public Knowledge filed comments supporting the FCC’s proposed action, which could increase consumer choice while bringing down prices without subjecting most kinds of online video services to additional regulation.

Read More
Post

Cable Companies are Making Things Up Again

January 28, 2015 Broadband , Comcast , FCC , highspeed internet , Time Warner Cable

NCTA Tells FCC One Thing and Consumers Another About Highspeed Internet

Read More
Post

Net Neutrality, Munibroadband, and the SOTU Shout Out

January 21, 2015 Broaband Access , Broadband , FCC , Municipal Broadband , Net Neutrality

For all us telecom geeks out there, the big deal was the President’s rather brief shout out on network neutrality and municipal broadband (munibroadband). You can see the full text of the speech here. The key paragraph was almost literally a blink and you miss it:

Read More
Post

Modernizing E-Rate Brings U.S. One Step Closer to Digital Equity

December 23, 2014 Broadband , E-Rate , FCC , Wi-Fi

On December 11th, the Federal Communications Commission voted to move forward with much needed and long awaited reforms to our nation’s E-rate program. With a 3-2 vote, Democratic Commissioners moved forward on a process that allocates $1 billion annually for expanded Wi-Fi connections in our schools and libraries.

Read More
Post

Throwing Shade at Title II with Forbearance Fearmongering

October 2, 2014 Broadband , FCC , Net Neutrality , Title II

As the groundswell for reclassifying broadband as a Title II telecommunications service and creating strong net neutrality rules grows, the arguments against reclassification have grown increasingly shrill and desperate. Most recently they have focused on “forbearance.” For those of you not living all of your lives in the world of telecom law, forbearance is the process the FCC could use to decide that some pieces of Title II should not apply to broadband. As illustrated below, these arguments do not stand up to scrutiny.

Read More
Post

Forbearance is Easy. Seriously.

July 14, 2014 Broadband , FCC , Net Neutrality , Title II

It’s easy for the FCC to set aside Title II rules that don’t apply in particular technological and market situations. In fact, it does this all the time.

Read More