Items tagged "Broadcast Flag"

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Connecting The Telecom Dots Behind ‘Net Neutrality’ (Hint: It’s About The Money)

February 23, 2010 AT&T , Broadcast Flag , Comcast , Competition , Network Neutrality

The Pew and the American Life project came out with a pretty scary report last week. The words, “Pew” and “scary” aren’t often used together, but in this case the description is apt.

Pew’s latest study on the future of the Internet asked in technical terms whether the Internet over the next 10 year will be controlled by consumers. The specific question was: Will the Internet still be dominated by the end?to?end principle? The “end-to-end principle” that was built into the Internet at its early stages means that consumers at one end of an Internet connection had a direct, one-to-one relationship with the online destination – a chat site, music site, shopping site, news site, whatever you want and wherever you want to go without interference or influence from the company making that connection for you – the Internet Service Provider (ISP).

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‘Tis the Season Part IV: PK and allies to USTR – It’s Time for an Office of Innovation

December 23, 2008 Broadcast Flag , Fair Use , FCC , Piracy , WIPO Broadcasters Treaty

Last Friday, Public Knowledge wrapped up a busy week of Presidential transition team meetings. First, as part of the Open Internet Coalition, PK and a number of its industry and public interest allies met with FCC Agency Review team co-chairs Susan Crawford and Kevin Werbach to discuss the Coalition's priorities and how we would like to see them implemented.

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‘Tis the Season Part III: USPTO Transition

December 18, 2008 Broadcast Flag , DRM , Fair Use , Orphan Works , Patent

Today PK, along with the Center for Democracy and Technology, Knowledge Ecology International, the Public Patent Foundation and representatives of the library community met with some of the members of transition team for the US Patent and Trademark Office. PK Advisory Board member and Duke University Professor Arti Rai, International Federation of the Phonographic Industry (IFPI) Executive Vice President for Global Legal Policy Shira Perlmutter and National Inventors Hall of Fame IP Counsel Joyce Ward were the team members who met with us.

Most of the discussion focused on the USPTO's role in International Copyright policymaking.

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How Hollywood Studios Promote File Trading: Delete Movies Off Digital Shelves

December 10, 2008 Analog Hole , Broadcast Flag , DRM , FCC

It's gotten so easy to rent movies on the ?tv that my wife had actually rented one, 27 Dresses, three times. Yes, the money we've spent to rent this particular movie has added up to more than the cost of owning the video. No, I'm not bitter about it or anything. Earlier this week, I was helping her put some movies on the ole' iPod so she could have some in-flight entertainment for a work trip. Of course, she wanted to have 27 Dresses again, so I said, "Can we please buy this movie once and for all?!"

Unfortunately, when I went to the iTunes Store, the movie was no where to be found–for rent or purchase. I wondered if anyone else had experienced this. I swore we rented it from iTunes, and verified it in my purchase history. The closest I could get to the movie was its soundtrack, it didn't appear to be available on the other movie download services either.

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Do 20 million HDTVs matter?

November 19, 2008 Broadcast Flag , FCC

Remember Selectable Output Control? It's the issue where the MPAA petitioned the FCC for the right to turn off any and all of the outputs on your cable box — especially those pesky high definition analog connections — if they move up the Video-on-Demand (VoD) release date on movies. In our original filing opposing the petition, we cited an article which said that 11 million HDTVs currently in use have only analog inputs, and would surely be cut off by the MPAA. News Corp shot back, saying that according to the Consumer Electronics Association (CEA), there were only 4 million such TVs out there. Who's right? Apparently, neither of us. Yesterday, CEA filed a letter with the FCC saying that there are over 20 million HDTVs currently in use which only have analog inputs, and if the petition were granted, would "no longer function as they did when originally purchased by U.S. consumers."

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Reflections on the 10th Anniversary of the Sonny Bono Act

October 29, 2008 Analog Hole , Broadcast Flag , DRM , Fair Use , Orphan Works

The 10th anniversary of the DMCA is not the only infamous 10th anniversary that Public Knowledge gets to “celebrate” this week. Yesterday was the 10th anniversary of the enactment of the Sonny Bono Copyright Term Extension Act of 1998. That law extended copyright terms from 50 years after the life of an author and 70 years in the case of corporations, to 70 years beyond the life of an author and 95 years in the case of corporations. Named after Sonny Bono, the late Congressman best known for his musical and personal partnership with the performer Cher, the law has taken countless works out of the public domain, greatly weakening the wellspring of creativity and knowledge from which new creativity emerges.

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A Perfect Storm of Bad Copyright Legislation

September 10, 2008 Broadcast Flag , DTV , Open Access to Research

Here at PK, we've been keeping our heads down the past few days, trying to fight against some really bad legislation. Once we finally get word of one, another one popped up. There are three in all (so far) are four (another was introduced during the writing of this post!!!) and we're going to need your help to put them away.

S. 3325, The Enforcement of Intellectual Property Rights Act of 2008

First up is the Senate's version of the House's PRO-IP bill, S. 3325, “The Enforcement of Intellectual Property Rights Act of 2008.” Rashmi's written a good breakdown of the differences between the bills, but that analysis may not hold up for long as we're hearing that, as you read this, a deal may have been made to nix the differences between the bills so a compromise can be passed with ease.

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Selectable Output Control? Sounds good, but who’s doing the selecting?

June 19, 2008 Analog Hole , Broadcast Flag

On May 9, the MPAA filed a petition to waive the FCC's ruling against selectable output control (SOC) (PDF). The MPAA and its studio constituents seek to allow multichannel video programming distributors (MVPDs) — that is, cable companies — the power to turn off the digital and analog outputs on your devices, as they choose. This includes not only cable boxes, but also anything connected to your cable signal, such as your Tivo, your Slingbox, or even a TV using CableCARD.

The MPAA and its studio constituents are interested in releasing theatrical releases to home viewers earlier than ever, possibly because box office receipts are growing at a slower rate than in the past decade. Before, release windows for video-on-demand and pay-per-view became available approximately five months after the theatrical release.

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Why The ‘Right’ Gets Net Neutrality Wrong

May 2, 2008 Broadcast Flag , Network Neutrality

Just in time for the House Telecom Subcommittee’s May 6 hearing on Net Neutrality legislation, Public Knowledge achieved a new level of notoriety when we were prominently mentioned in a blog post on the American Spectator, the publication best known for funneling millions of dollars to investigations of Bill and Hillary Clinton.

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S. 4108, the APRIL Act, and the Realities Behind It

April 1, 2008 Broadcast Flag , DRM , Fair Use , Piracy , WIPO Broadcasters Treaty

OK. Hopefully you all realized that S. 4108, the APRIL Act of 2008, was a joke. After all, there were a few excesses in there that would indicate how ludicrous the bill is.

Well, sort of. A lot of the provisions we included in the fake bill were modeled after real proposals made either by legislators, content industry lobbyists, or other policymakers. Some of the provisions were even taken verbatim from introduced legislation like the PRO IP Act and the IP Enforcement Act. We've posted a newly marked-up version that provides the sources of some of the provisions of the APRIL Act, showing that a lot of the silliness surrounding IP policy isn't limited to today.

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