Items tagged "CBRS"

Press Release

Public Knowledge Urges FCC to Reject Package Bidding Proposal in CBRS PALS Auction

September 26, 2019 3.5GHz , CBRS , cellular market area (CMA) , Digital Divide , digital equity , FCC , PALs , Spectrum

Today, the Federal Communications Commission approved a Public Notice proposing application and bidding procedures for the auction of Priority Access Licenses (PALs) in the 3.5 GHz Band Citizens Broadband Radio Service (CBRS). Public Knowledge has long supported the innovative spectrum licensing framework adopted for the CBRS and urges that it should serve as a model […]

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Press Release

FCC 3.5 GHz Band License Changes Will Make Closing the Rural Digital Divide More Difficult

October 23, 2018 3.5GHz , 5G , CBRS , FCC , Rural Access

Today, the Federal Communications Commission voted to approve a Report and Order to make changes to its Priority Access Licenses in the 3.5 GHz Band (3550-3700 MHz). Today’s action needlessly rolls back a unanimous 5-0 Commission vote from April 2015 and is counterproductive to helping the agency achieve its stated goal of closing the rural digital divide.

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Press Release

Advocates Ask FCC Chairman Not To Take Away 5G Spectrum From Rural America

October 11, 2018 5G , CBRS , Rural Access , Spectrum

Today, Public Knowledge joined 20 rural advocacy organizations, rural healthcare providers, rural network operators, and public interest advocates in a letter urging Federal Communications Commission Chairman Ajit Pai to preserve the existing Citizens Band Radio Service (CBRS) rules that enable small providers to offer service in rural areas.

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Post

The FCC is Preparing to Take Yet Another Hit at Rural America, but It’s Not Too Late to Stop It

October 11, 2018 CBRS , FCC , Spectrum , Spectrum Licensing , Spectrum Reform

The FCC is about to take spectrum away from rural providers and we are making a last minute effort to stop it. Today we sent a letter to FCC Chairman Ajit Pai, and we are calling on you to contact Congress. Here’s why:

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