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Your Landlord Might Be Making Deals With Broadband Providers. We Want Them to Stop.

Let me tell you a story about my attempts to get broadband internet access at my old apartment building. I had just finished law school and moved into a large corporate apartment in the Washington, D.C. area. After doing some research, I picked the broadband and cable plan that was best for me and my […]

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The BOSS Act Protects Both the Rights and Pocketbooks of Event-Goers

This week, Congressman Pascrell (D-NJ), Congressman Pallone (D-NJ), and Senator Blumenthal reintroduced the BOSS Act in a renewed attempt to bring transparency and fair practices to the online market for event tickets. Public Knowledge applauds the Act, which looks to end the worst abuses of the consolidated ticket sale/resale market while maintaining an individual ticket holder’s right to do what they want with the ticket they purchased.

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Interoperability = Privacy + Competition

As Congress and other relevant stakeholders debate how to protect Americans’ privacy, a key concern is making sure that new legislation doesn’t entrench the power of big tech incumbents. In this post, we argue that incorporating data interoperability into privacy legislation is essential to empowering consumers’ data rights and fostering a competitive marketplace.

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FTC Should Continue to Fight for Lower Consumer Prices in Qualcomm Lawsuit

Back in November, Public Knowledge and Open Markets Institute argued to the International Trade Commission that it would violate the public interest to grant Qualcomm’s request to ban iPhones that used Intel baseband technology from the U.S. market. We wrote then,

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We Don’t Have to Sacrifice User Safety and Convenience to Make App Stores Competitive

App stores, such as Google Play and Apple’s App Store, have been good for consumers and independent developers in a number of ways. When they work well, they provide consumers with a convenient way to find and buy software that is safe and functional. I remember when my non-technical friends would never install software on their PCs, assuming that it was all a scam or malware of some kind. Now these same people can confidently install, use, and uninstall apps without fearing that it will ruin their devices or steal their personal information. Again, this is when things are working right. There are always bad actors to be vigilant against, and different app store curators do their jobs more and less well.

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