Items tagged "Consumer Privacy"

Post

Federal Privacy Legislation Is [TBD]: Congress Has Made Progress, but Still Has a Ways to Go

March 2, 2020 Consumer Privacy , Online Privacy , Privacy Legislation

Late last year, while folks were carving up turkeys and shopping for holiday gifts, the Commerce Committees on both sides of Capitol Hill were busy introducing long-awaited privacy legislation. For years now, Public Knowledge has been calling for comprehensive federal privacy legislation to protect our fundamental right to privacy online that includes (among other things) […]

Read More
Post

What Federal Legislators Can Learn From California’s New Ballot Initiative

November 7, 2019 Agency Authority , CCPA , Consumer Privacy , CPRA , Data Privacy , Data Protection , Legislation , Privacy , Privacy Legislation

On January 1, 2020, the nation’s strictest privacy law, the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA), will take effect. The law empowers consumers to (1) be informed about what personal information a company has collected about them; (2) delete that data; and (3) opt out of companies selling that data to third parties. On top of […]

Read More
Post

Will the FCC Keep Ignoring Carriers That Sell Your GPS Data?

March 13, 2019 Consumer Privacy , Data Protection , E911 , FCC , Privacy

Over the last three months, Motherboard’s Joseph Cox has produced an excellent series of articles on how the major mobile carriers have sold sensitive geolocation data to bounty hunters and others, including highly precise information designed for use with “Enhanced 911” (E911). As we pointed out last month when this news came to light, turning over this E911 data (called assisted GPS or A-GPS), exposing E911 data to third parties — whether by accident or intentionally, or using it in any way except for 911 or other purposes required by law violates the rules the Federal Communications Commission adopted in 2015 to protect E911 data.

Read More
Post

Consumer Privacy Before Congress This Week: What We Learned and What’s Next

February 28, 2019 Consumer Privacy , Data Protection , FTC , Legislation , Privacy

This week featured back-to-back privacy hearings on Capitol Hill to discuss principles for federal privacy legislation. With the one-year anniversary of the European Union’s General Data Protection Regulation implementation coming in May and the California Consumer Privacy Act taking effect in 2020, industry players that have fiercely lobbied against federal privacy legislation in years past are now suddenly calling on Congress to pass a comprehensive privacy bill this year. Here’s a quick look at what happened in each hearing and a few key takeaways.

Read More
Post

Telecom Giants Broke the Law By Selling Detailed Location Data. Will They Face Consequences?

February 8, 2019 Consumer Privacy , Data Protection , E911 , FCC , Privacy

More details have emerged from the Motherboard investigation into carriers selling their customers’ real-time location data, including assisted GPS (“A-GPS”) data intended only for emergency services. The reports are shocking and illustrate both a brazen disregard for consumer privacy on the part of the companies involved and the disturbing, unregulated behavior of the data brokerage industry. The Federal Communications Commission, led by Chairman Ajit Pai, needs to act immediately to enforce what appears to be a clear violation of the FCC’s rules against the selling of A-GPS data with third parties. In addition, Congress must pass comprehensive privacy legislation that forces the data broker industry out of the shadows and stops the persistent misuse of data at the expense of consumer privacy.

Read More
Post

Is California’s New Privacy Law Right for the United States?

July 16, 2018 California , Consumer Privacy , Data Protection , Legislation , Privacy

At the end of June, California enacted what has been billed as a comprehensive privacy law. By all accounts, it was a rush job, negotiated in a week behind closed doors in a desperate and successful attempt to keep Californians for Consumer Privacy Campaign Chairman Alaistair MacTaggart’s privacy initiative off the November ballot. As sometimes happens, the law’s proponents and a few reporters may have overhyped the legislation – both given its current contents and because many expect it to change before its effective date in January 2020.

Read More
Post

Members of Congress Tackle Consumer Protection Failures from Equifax Breach

October 13, 2017 Consumer Privacy , Cybersecurity , Equifax , Privacy , security

Last week, Congress held four hearings to investigate the Equifax data breach, which jeopardized the highly sensitive data of 145 millions Americans. The exposed consumer information includes social security numbers, prior addresses, student loans, credit card numbers, and other pieces of private data compiled into credit reports that determine if a consumer qualifies for employment, loans, or new lines of credit. For days, members of Congress questioned former Equifax CEO Richard Smith as to how the breach could have occurred and what steps the company was taking to protect consumers. Mr. Smith resigned in September after the extent of the breach was fully disclosed. During the hearings, he offered little in terms of solutions on how to protect consumers going forward, but his answers revealed significant problems with our current data security regime that Congress must address.

Read More
Post

Waive Goodbye to Your Rights: Equifax and Corporate America’s Love Affair with Forced Arbitration

October 7, 2017 Consumer Privacy , Cybersecurity , Equifax , Privacy , security

This past week, Congress demanded answers from former Equifax CEO Richard Smith about what, exactly, went so terribly wrong in his company’s handling of its massive data breach this summer, and to ask how to keep something like this from happening again. Over the course of four hearings in both the Senate and the House, it became clear that the list of “wrongs” is lengthy. But one of the most damning revelations emerged in the aftermath of the breach in the company’s attempts to mitigate harm post-breach. To be clear, we’re not talking about mitigating consumer harm – we’re talking about Equifax protecting itself from accountability through the use of forced arbitration.

Read More
Post

The Right Response to Equifax

September 12, 2017 Consumer Privacy , Cybersecurity , Equifax , Privacy , security

Lots and lots and lots of people are talking about the Equifax breach. Many share similar views: this can’t happen again, Equifax should face some economic consequence, consumers need to be better educated, we need legislation, we need regulation. All of which may be valid and reasonable, but few of which will actually happen. Foremost among them, we will have another breach.

Read More
Post

Setting the Record Straight: What the Congressional Review Act Means for the FCC’s Broadband Privacy

March 16, 2017 Broadband Privacy , Consumer Privacy , FCC , FTC , Privacy

One significant threat to the public interest under the new administration that is receiving increased attention is broadband privacy for consumers. Last week, Senator Jeff Flake and 21 cosponsors introduced a resolution under the Congressional Review Act to repeal the Federal Communications Commission’s broadband privacy rules. In late October, after over six months of deliberation, the FCC passed rules governing how Internet Service Providers use the personal information that they collect on their customers. Put simply, ISPs would be required to obtain opt-in consent before using anything sensitive like web browsing history, your location, financial information, and information relating to children.

Read More