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ISPs Should Not Be Copyright Cops

December 9, 2019 Content Liability , Content Moderation , Copyright , Copyright Reform , DMCA , ISPs , Online Copyright

The internet era ushered in a new way for people around the world to access creative works with the click of a mouse or the tap of a finger. We all know that consumer demand outpaced the business models of entertainment companies, and music, movies, and other copyrighted works were, and still are, often accessed […]

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It’s Time To Pull Back the Curtain on the Termination Right

December 5, 2019 Copyright , Copyright Reform , Music Licensing , Termination Right

You can read our new white paper, Making Sense of the Termination Right: How the System Fails Artists and How to Fix It, at publicknowledge.org/Termination.  Hidden inside Title 17 of the United States Code of Laws sits an unassuming but powerful right that Congress gave to artists and creators: the termination right. Unlike many statutory […]

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To Fight Misinformation, Bring our Libraries Online

May 7, 2019 CDL , controlled digital lending , Copyright Reform

Misinformation — how it develops, how it spreads, and why people believe it — is an unavoidable topic in current information policy debates. And though headlines have largely focused on the high-profile impacts of misinformation on everything from public health to voting behaviors and technological literacy, there’s another, more important question at stake: How do we combat it when it emerges?

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The Online Censorship Machine Is Revving Up: Here Are a Few Lessons Learned

April 18, 2019 copyright directive , Copyright Reform , DMCA , Fair Use , Music Licensing

About a week ago, I did my usual check-in with Rick Beato’s channel on YouTube to see what new videos he had in store for me. I’m a former working musician, and one who supplemented my income by teaching music, so I was easily sold on Beato’s combination of fun music-related videos like “Top 20 Greatest Rock Guitar Sounds” and in-the-weeds educational videos on music theory. His channel is one of many on YouTube that offer music education, cultural preservation, and creative ways to bring great music to wider audiences. So, needless to say, I was less-than-thrilled to see that he had just live streamed a rant against a huge uptick of efforts to block his videos and those by other creators who also rely on using musical elements to create new content. These copyright strikes had been targeting many of these creators’ most successful videos, which often had been around for years and had attracted big audiences — some with over a million views. One of the impacted videos was Beato’s 20-minute piece on the history of rock guitar, which was taken down for using just 10 seconds of a live, improvised guitar solo by Ozzy Osbourne’s former guitar player, Randy Rhoads. One of Paul Davids’s videos was blocked for playing one chord (Dsus2 for those music geeks following along) in a guitar lesson video. Even in the squishy world of fair use, these seem as close to slam dunk examples of fair use as you can get.

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Spotify’s Copyright Royalty Board Appeal, Decoded

April 10, 2019 Copyright , Copyright Reform , Music Licensing , Royalties , Spotify

Nothing has dominated recent music news (at least not since the passage of the Music Modernization Act) as much as Spotify’s decision to appeal the findings of the Copyright Royalty Board, or CRB. The move prompted backlash from music publishers and a rebuttal from Spotify, but the actual facts of the debate are buried under piles of legalese.

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