Items tagged "Copyright Reform"

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No One Should Have to Wait Eight Months for a Library Book

August 7, 2020 CDL , controlled digital lending , Copyright , Copyright Reform , Digital First Sale , Ereaders , Fair Use , First Sale Doctrine , Libraries

After recent Black Lives Matter protests, Americans rushed to libraries to request books on history, politics, and anti-racism. There were immediate shortages of certain books, with up to six month waits for commonly recommended titles. This happened throughout the entire system — even electronic books had long queues to check out. This is, in part, […]

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Libraries Are Updating for Today’s Digital Needs. Congress Needs to Clear the Way.

July 1, 2020 CDL , controlled digital lending , Copyright , Copyright Reform , Digital First Sale , Ereaders , Fair Use , First Sale Doctrine , Legislation , Libraries

Libraries have been central to culture, education, and research for centuries. Libraries have been part of America since the early 18th Century; the most famous early American library, (though not the first), was founded by Benjamin Franklin and others in Philadelphia in 1731. Libraries have taken many shapes — they’ve been public and private; membership-based […]

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This blog post is part of a series on communications policies Public Knowledge recommends in response to the pandemic. You can read more of our proposals here and view the full series here. The right to repair consumer goods such as gaming systems, appliances, and even medical equipment is more important than ever now that we are living […]

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Press Release

Meredith Rose to Testify Before Senate Judiciary Committee On the Digital Millennium Copyright Act

June 2, 2020 Copyright , Copyright Reform , DMCA , Notice and Takedown , Section 512 , testimony

Public Knowledge Policy Counsel Meredith Rose will testify before the U.S. Senate Judiciary Committee’s Subcommittee on Intellectual Property today at 2:30 p.m. Her testimony in the hearing, “Is the DMCA’s Notice-and-Takedown System Working in the 21st Century?,” will warn Congress not to reduce the debate on Section 512 of the Digital Millennium Copyright Act to “Big Tech” vs “Big Entertainment” — jeopardizing internet users in the process.

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Press Release

Public Knowledge Warns New Copyright Office Study Risks Free Speech, Online Marketplace

May 22, 2020 Copyright Office , Copyright Reform , Free Expression , Free Speech , Report , Safe Harbor , Section 512

Yesterday, the U.S. Copyright Office released a report evaluating the impact and effectiveness of the “safe harbor” provisions contained in Section 512 of the Digital Millennium Copyright Act. The report recommends “rebalancing” the “safe harbor” protection — jeopardizing one of the most important safeguards for the Open Internet without taking due account of ways the current system has been abused.

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Join Us as We Welcome New Works to the Public Domain on Public Domain Day!

January 30, 2020 Copyright , Copyright Act , Copyright Reform , Cosplay , Public Domain , Public Domain Day

Today is Public Domain Day! Come celebrate with us from 5- 9 pm at American University Washington College of Law. View the program and register here. 2019 was the first year that works protected by the Copyright Extension Act—those created after 1923—entered the public domain. This year we are celebrating all the copyrighted works from […]

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ISPs Should Not Be Copyright Cops

December 9, 2019 Content Liability , Content Moderation , Copyright , Copyright Reform , DMCA , ISPs , Online Copyright

The internet era ushered in a new way for people around the world to access creative works with the click of a mouse or the tap of a finger. We all know that consumer demand outpaced the business models of entertainment companies, and music, movies, and other copyrighted works were, and still are, often accessed […]

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It’s Time To Pull Back the Curtain on the Termination Right

December 5, 2019 Copyright , Copyright Reform , Music Licensing , Termination Right

You can read our new white paper, Making Sense of the Termination Right: How the System Fails Artists and How to Fix It, at publicknowledge.org/Termination.  Hidden inside Title 17 of the United States Code of Laws sits an unassuming but powerful right that Congress gave to artists and creators: the termination right. Unlike many statutory […]

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To Fight Misinformation, Bring our Libraries Online

May 7, 2019 CDL , controlled digital lending , Copyright Reform

Misinformation — how it develops, how it spreads, and why people believe it — is an unavoidable topic in current information policy debates. And though headlines have largely focused on the high-profile impacts of misinformation on everything from public health to voting behaviors and technological literacy, there’s another, more important question at stake: How do we combat it when it emerges?

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The Online Censorship Machine Is Revving Up: Here Are a Few Lessons Learned

April 18, 2019 copyright directive , Copyright Reform , DMCA , Fair Use , Music Licensing

About a week ago, I did my usual check-in with Rick Beato’s channel on YouTube to see what new videos he had in store for me. I’m a former working musician, and one who supplemented my income by teaching music, so I was easily sold on Beato’s combination of fun music-related videos like “Top 20 Greatest Rock Guitar Sounds” and in-the-weeds educational videos on music theory. His channel is one of many on YouTube that offer music education, cultural preservation, and creative ways to bring great music to wider audiences. So, needless to say, I was less-than-thrilled to see that he had just live streamed a rant against a huge uptick of efforts to block his videos and those by other creators who also rely on using musical elements to create new content. These copyright strikes had been targeting many of these creators’ most successful videos, which often had been around for years and had attracted big audiences — some with over a million views. One of the impacted videos was Beato’s 20-minute piece on the history of rock guitar, which was taken down for using just 10 seconds of a live, improvised guitar solo by Ozzy Osbourne’s former guitar player, Randy Rhoads. One of Paul Davids’s videos was blocked for playing one chord (Dsus2 for those music geeks following along) in a guitar lesson video. Even in the squishy world of fair use, these seem as close to slam dunk examples of fair use as you can get.

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