Items tagged "Copyright Reform"

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Our Call for Copyright Balance in NAFTA Renegotiations

January 22, 2018 Copyright , Copyright Reform , NAFTA , RIAA , TPP

Later this month, the U.S., Canada, and Mexico will launch their sixth round of negotiations for the modernization of the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA). Recent news coverage has focused on whether the Trump administration will withdraw from the agreement or not. As civil society continues to be excluded from this process, there is still little information about actual intellectual property proposals, but the position of Public Knowledge remains unchanged: trade agreements must promote a balanced copyright system that serves the public interest.

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Press Release

Public Knowledge Strongly Opposes Misguided EU Copyright Reform

March 26, 2019 copyright directive , Copyright Reform , European Union

Today, the European Parliament voted 348 to 274 to approve the proposed Copyright Directive. This EU-wide legislation will impose draconian copyright obligations on nearly all internet services and companies, requiring content upload filters, convoluted and uncertain licensing agreements with the entertainment industries, and the payment of a link tax or new licensing fee to news incumbents. EU member states will likely move to ratify the proposal next.

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On Ajit Pai, Fair Use, and “Harlem Shake”

December 20, 2017 Copyright , Copyright Reform , DMCA , Fair Use , Net Neutrality

The policy sphere has its knickers in a knot over Federal Communications Commission Chairman Ajit Pai’s meme-filled video collaboration with The Daily Caller. In the video, Chairman Pai defends his decision to repeal net neutrality protections by enumerating the things folks can still do on the internet.

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The CASE Act: Small Claims, Big Risks

November 7, 2017 Copyright , Copyright Office , Copyright Reform , Ligitation , Small Claims

It’s almost axiomatic that independent artists face unique difficulties in the digital environment. Unlicensed commercial use of creative works is not uncommon, and the money that those uses theoretically represent in unpaid licensing fees can be substantial. So it’s understandable that artists would push for a system that makes it cheaper and easier for them to recover royalties for infringements of their copyrights.

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Anticircumvention Report: Copyright Office Discounts User Community

July 25, 2017 1201 Reform , Anticircumvention , Copyright Reform , DMCA , Section 1201

This summer, the Copyright Office released a study on Section 1201 of the Digital Millennium Copyright Act. Section 1201 is the provision of the law that allows copyright owners to digitally lock you out of your own stuff, preventing everything from connecting your cellphone to a different carrier, to ripping your DVDs to your tablet, to accessing the diagnostic system in your car. We’ve long advocated for reforming this law which unnecessarily limits user rights, and actively participated in the Office’s study of Section 1201. The resulting report is less than we hoped for; while the Office has recommended some important and needed changes to the law and its application, it mostly leaves the law in place and has us asking what could have been. The report does, however, reveal something interesting about how the Copyright Office thinks about Section 1201–namely, when it chooses to believe (or not believe) the users.

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Packingham and the Public Forum Doctrine: Implications for Copyright

June 22, 2017 Copyright Reform , DMCA , Free Speech , Notice and Takedown , Supreme Court

The Supreme Court’s recent decision in Packingham v. North Carolina struck down, as unconstitutional under the First Amendment, a state law making it a felony for registered sex offenders to access social media websites. The decision has wide-ranging potential implications for technology law, especially on matters of rights to access the internet, which are particularly important for marginalized and disenfranchised voices in our society. Below, Harold Feld reviews the Packingham decision and explores its implications for one area of law: the Digital Millennium Copyright Act’s provisions regarding termination of Internet access for accused copyright infringers. This post was originally posted on Harold’s personal blog, “Tales of the Sausage Factory,” on wetmachine.com.

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Civil Society of the Americas Concerned About the Future of Copyright

April 27, 2017 Copyright , Copyright Reform , Intellectual Property , International , Internet Freedom

Yesterday, April 26, was World Intellectual Property Day. However, in many countries we see extremist proposals to expand copyright and intellectual property, which benefit only a handful of rightholders at the expense of the rest of society. That´s why, together with 13 civil society organizations from the Americas, we published an open letter calling on our governments to protect innovation, preserve fair access to technology and internet freedom, and use copyright to promote social justice.

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Press Release

Public Knowledge Opposes EU Parliament’s Adoption of Copyright Directive Harming Free Expression Online

September 12, 2018 copyright directive , Copyright Reform , European Union , Fair Use , Freedom of Expression

Today, the European Parliament voted to amend the Copyright Directive to force platform companies to create content-upload filters and pay media organizations a link tax. Public Knowledge specifically opposes policies like Article 13 and Article 11. Once adopted by Europe, there is a substantial danger that this idea might be adopted around the world.

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One Step Forward, Two Steps Back: IPEC’s Three-Year Plan

January 18, 2017 Copyright Reform , Copyright Week , DMCA , IPEC

IPEC nods toward balanced copyright but endorses unbalanced enforcement agenda.

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Consequences of BMG Rights Management v. Cox Communications

December 1, 2016 Broadband Access , Copyright , Copyright Reform , Homework Gap , Litigation

Imagine this: Your family is at your place for Thanksgiving and, all of a sudden, your mother has a heart attack. You rush to the phone and dial 9-1-1. You’re told by an automated message that your internet has been disconnected for alleged copyright infringement, so your emergency call cannot be completed. Unbeknownst to you, HBO noticed that your roommate had been illegally downloading Game of Thrones, and called upon your Internet Service Provider to disconnect your account.

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