Items tagged "Cybersecurity"

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Is the GDPR Right for the United States?

April 9, 2018 Cybersecurity , Data Protection , GDPR , Privacy , security

Europe’s new privacy law, the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) will enter into force in May 2018. Understandably, given that data breaches and privacy violations have been in the headlines lately — and given that the GDPR will reshuffle privacy protection in Europe and beyond — many in the United States are looking to the GDPR for ideas of what to do – and what not to do. We think that it would be impractical and ineffective to copy and paste the GDPR to U.S. law — the institutions and legal systems are just too different.

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Here’s How Congress Should Respond to Facebook/Cambridge Analytica

March 23, 2018 Cybersecurity , Data Breach , Legislation , Privacy , security

Facebook and Cambridge Analytica. By now we know the basic facts: Aleksandr Kogan, purporting to be a researcher, developed an authorized Facebook application. As was Facebook’s practice at the time, when users connected the app to their Facebook accounts, the app scooped up not only the users’ personal information, but also their friends’ personal information. In this manner, Dr. Kogan was able to amass information about 50 million Facebook users – even though only 270,000 individuals used the app. Dr. Kogan then, exceeding his authorized use of the data, funneled that information to Cambridge Analytica, a firm that purported to engage in “psychographics” to influence voters on behalf of the Trump campaign.

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Analyzing Congress’ Response to Data Breaches: Do Proposed Bills Protect You?

January 26, 2018 Cybersecurity , Data Security , Equifax , Privacy , security

For nearly three months last summer, the sensitive personal data of more than 145 million American consumers was exposed to bad actors thanks to some “ham-fisted” behavior on the part of credit reporting giant, Equifax. Americans were outraged, and lawmakers began to scrutinize Equifax’s behavior during the breach, including three Equifax senior executives selling shares worth almost $1.8 million in the days after the company discovered the hack.

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Members of Congress Tackle Consumer Protection Failures from Equifax Breach

October 13, 2017 Consumer Privacy , Cybersecurity , Equifax , Privacy , security

Last week, Congress held four hearings to investigate the Equifax data breach, which jeopardized the highly sensitive data of 145 millions Americans. The exposed consumer information includes social security numbers, prior addresses, student loans, credit card numbers, and other pieces of private data compiled into credit reports that determine if a consumer qualifies for employment, loans, or new lines of credit. For days, members of Congress questioned former Equifax CEO Richard Smith as to how the breach could have occurred and what steps the company was taking to protect consumers. Mr. Smith resigned in September after the extent of the breach was fully disclosed. During the hearings, he offered little in terms of solutions on how to protect consumers going forward, but his answers revealed significant problems with our current data security regime that Congress must address.

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Review of PK/OAS Roundtable on Civil Society and Cybersecurity in the Americas

October 12, 2017 Civil Society , Cybersecurity , International , Internet Governance , The Americas

Last week, Public Knowledge and the Organization of American States (OAS) organized a joint roundtable on “Cybersecurity and Civil Society in the Americas,” which took place at the OAS headquarters in Washington, D.C. Thanks to the support of Open Society Foundations, the roundtable included civil society organizations from all over the Americans: Derechos Digitales, Instituto Brasileiro de Defesa do Consumidor (IDEC), ADC Asociación por los Derechos Civiles (ADC), Centro de Estudios Legales y Sociales (CELS), Karisma, TEDIC, Red en Defensa de los Derechos Digitales (R3D), CodingRights, InternetLab, Datos Protegidos, Ipandetec, Hiperderecho, Access Now, New America, and more. It also included the active participation of high-ranking members of the Canadian, American, Colombian, and Guatemalan governments, the Brazilian Armed Forces, and private organizations.

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Waive Goodbye to Your Rights: Equifax and Corporate America’s Love Affair with Forced Arbitration

October 7, 2017 Consumer Privacy , Cybersecurity , Equifax , Privacy , security

This past week, Congress demanded answers from former Equifax CEO Richard Smith about what, exactly, went so terribly wrong in his company’s handling of its massive data breach this summer, and to ask how to keep something like this from happening again. Over the course of four hearings in both the Senate and the House, it became clear that the list of “wrongs” is lengthy. But one of the most damning revelations emerged in the aftermath of the breach in the company’s attempts to mitigate harm post-breach. To be clear, we’re not talking about mitigating consumer harm – we’re talking about Equifax protecting itself from accountability through the use of forced arbitration.

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The Right Response to Equifax

September 12, 2017 Consumer Privacy , Cybersecurity , Equifax , Privacy , security

Lots and lots and lots of people are talking about the Equifax breach. Many share similar views: this can’t happen again, Equifax should face some economic consequence, consumers need to be better educated, we need legislation, we need regulation. All of which may be valid and reasonable, but few of which will actually happen. Foremost among them, we will have another breach.

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The White House Is Paranoid Over Its Privacy, and Consumers Should Be Too

March 21, 2017 Broadband Privacy , Cybersecurity , FCC , Privacy , Save Broadband Privacy

In the early months of the Trump Administration, damaging leaks have come out of the White House ranging from stories of staff infighting to descriptions of the President’s calls with heads of state. According to a recent Politico report, the leaks have caused a culture of paranoia to spread among White House staff. Staffers are taking extreme measures to protect their privacy by turning off work-issued smartphones when they get home, and using encrypted messaging apps that automatically delete messages once they’ve been read. Others are leaving their personal mobile devices at home in the event their bosses and Administration lawyers engage in phone checks and search for leaks. While White House staffers scramble to protect their private communications, Congress is moving in the opposite direction to eliminate any expectations of Americans having private communications networks.

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Public Knowledge Welcomes the Newly Adopted WSIS+10 Outcome Document

December 21, 2015 Cybersecurity , ICTs , Internet Governance , WSIS , WSIS+10

On December 16, after an intense round of negotiations among United Nations (UN) member states, the UN General Assembly (UNGA) adopted the final outcome document regarding the ten-year review of the implementation of the World Summit on the Information Society (WSIS+10). Public Knowledge welcomes this outcome document as a positive step towards achieving an inclusive knowledge society and promoting a free and open Internet.

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