Items tagged "DVR"

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PK In The Know Podcast: Hopper, YouTube Covers, and TPP/ITU

June 8, 2012 DVR , International , Music , Music Licensing

On today’s podcast we discuss who gets to control your DVR, more cover songs on YouTube, and international policy madness with the TPP and ITU.

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Click here to download the file for this week’s podcast directly.

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FCC Patches CableCARD; Doubles Down on AllVid

October 14, 2010 DVR , Innovation , MVPD , Plug and Play , Set-Top Box

It’s great to see the FCC issuing orders and moving its agenda forward. The National Broadband Plan called for the Commission to increase video device competition–that is, to create the conditions that allow for third-party devices to as easily interoperate with cable or satellite video as they can with Internet-delivered content. The Commission just took an important step in the right direction by issuing an order designed to fix some of the most egregious consumer issues that have made using CableCARD devices such a challenge. CableCARD is far from an ideal solution (for example, you can’t use it with satellite), but with AllVid (the proposed successor) still on the drawing board, it’s all we’ve got for the next few years.

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Standards good. Tech mandates bad.

April 29, 2010 DVR , Innovation , Internet Protocol , Set-Top Box

What exactly is the difference between a “standard” and a “tech mandate”? There was some confusion today at the House hearing on the FCC’s efforts to promote a more competitive market in home video devices. (Here’s Harold’s written testimony from the hearing.)

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The Broadband Plan: A Gateway to Video Innovation

March 16, 2010 DVR , Set-Top Box

Today's Broadband Plan has great things to say on the topic of video device compatibility–the idea that consumers should be able to access the video content they pay for on any device. It recommends that the Commission pursue a "gateway" approach: a lightweight model that allows for compatibility between consumer devices and networks such as cable, satellite, or FiOS TV. Late last year, Public Knowledge and others filed a petition with the FCC asking that it follow this exact approach–a petition cited heavily by the Plan.

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PK Responds to the MPAA on SOC: VoD Before DVD is OK Today

November 10, 2009 DVR , Fair Use , FCC , Set-Top Box , SOC

Last week the MPAA sent another letter to the FCC trying to defend its Selectable Output Control (SOC) proposal and calling out Public Knowledge. We sent a formal reply to the FCC today. All of this means that what we are doing is working, but it also means that the MPAA is not giving up. Here’s Mr. X-Parté to recap the action so far, along with PK’s response:

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SOC in Context

November 9, 2009 Analog Hole , DVR , MPAA , Set-Top Box , SOC

The MPAA's attempt to get the FCC to allow Hollywood to impose Selectable Output Control (SOC) on consumers has gotten quite a bit of coverage in the tech-savvy blogosphere over the past few days.

I was reading through the comments on two prominent blogs' postings, Boing Boing's Tell the FCC to say no to Hollywood's insane "Selectable Output Control" kill-switch and Gizmodo's MPAA Still Trying to Plug Your Analog Hole with Selectable Output Control, and it appears that even among a very informed subsection of the public, SOC still causes a lot of confusion. The main point of confusion is the relationship of SOC to other forms of video DRM.

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DVR: the New Player Piano

November 2, 2009 DVR , Fair Use , Set-Top Box

My favorite poster on the walls here at Public Knowledge is one called “You’ve Heard This Song Before.” It collects the assorted FUD that has accompanied disruptive media technologies over the years. The death of American music in 1906 at the hands of the Player Piano, FM radio destroying the (shockingly still vibrant at the time in light of the success of the player piano) recorded music industry in 1925, the “assault” on the “economic life” of the movie industry by the VCR in 1982, and the “noose” around the neck of songwriters that would cease the creation of all records that was the recordable cassette tape in 1982.

I like this poster so much because each quote represents someone successfully working in the content industry being completely unable to understand the difference between change, death, and opportunity.

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Selectable Output Control: Why?!

October 15, 2009 DVR , FCC , HDTV , Innovation , Set-Top Box

You may remember that at the end of last year, the FCC declined to give a small group of Hollywood studios the ability to turn off the video inputs that over 20 million high definition televisions rely on. Almost a year later, the MPAA is back, threatening not make content available, responding to year-old arguments while trying to pretend 2009 never happened, and making a lot of noise without saying anything new. So we're back, too, with a letter detailing why the MPAA's petition to use Selectable Output Control (SOC) at worst imposes millions of dollars of costs on consumers and at best leaves us scratching our heads asking why the Commission would even consider it.

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Supreme Court Declines to Hear Cablevision Case: Video Providers, Consumers and Innovation all Win

June 29, 2009 DVR , Fair Use , MPAA

We just got word that the Supreme Court has declined to review the Cablevision remote DVR case. This is the case where Hollywood and some cable networks sued Cablevision for providing a TiVo-like service where the copy of the recorded program resides on the cable operator's servers rather than on a hard drive in the home. The studios claimed that both the buffer copies and the copies residing on Cablevision's servers were a violation of its right to reproduce the program, and that the recordings sent to the customer were a violation of its public performance right. A lower court in New York City sided with Hollywood, but the 2nd Circuit Court of Appeals reversed that decision, ruling that the remote DVR service did not violate Hollywood's copyrights.

The Court's decision not to take the case is a huge victory for consumers and all video service providers, not just cable.

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