Items tagged "Future of Video"

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SlingTV, Yahoo NFL Streaming, and What Online Video Means for Sports Fans

July 2, 2015 Future of Video , Online Video , OTT Content , Video Marketplace

For many Americans, live sports are the last piece of television content that is appointment viewing. And for many Americans, the only thing of value on television is the NFL. The fact that fans want to watch sports live, along with the sheer number of viewers of NFL games, makes live streaming of sports content vital to the future of online video.

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Uh oh, Aereo

June 30, 2014 Aereo , Copyright Reform , Future of Video

Last Wednesday, the Supreme Court ruled that Aereo violates U.S. copyright law through their business model that allows users to stream network television over the internet. Read thoughts on this decision from Public Knowledge Senior Staff Attorney John Bergmayer below.

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Supreme Court Decides to Hear Aereo Case

January 10, 2014 Copyright , Future of Video

Today, the Supreme Court decided it will hear a case that could determine the future of many online computing services, with additional implications for the video marketplace.


Today, the Supreme Court decided it would review the Second Circuit’s decision that online service Aereo was not infringing copyrights in television programming. In April of last year, the appeals court in New York held that Aereo was not violating the copyright holders’ public performance right when it transmits over-the-air broadcasts to individual users on the Internet.

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More Reports of Technology Giants Interested in Internet TV Show That the Problem Isn’t Technology

July 17, 2013 Future of Video , MVPD

Technology isn’t holding back Internet TV—the structure of the media industry is.


Rumors of Intel’s and Apple’s interest in launching some kind of online cable service have been circulating for months. Years, even. It’s clear that major tech companies have the technology ready, and they’ve been making phone calls and taking meetings. People talk, reports get written. Now, we can add Google to the mix. As the Wall Street Journal first reported, it’s interested in launching some kind of online TV service, too—one that is intended to actually substitute for a traditional pay TV subscription by having current, popular shows from both cable and broadcast channels, and not just supplement it with on-demand access to a back catalog or user-generated content.

So with all these rumors, and all these giant tech companies involved, why haven’t we actually seen a service get launched? The technology’s ready. Other countries already have online cable TV–Sweden’s Magine, a company that outright says “We’re meaning to replace your cable network,” is expanding internationally. Why doesn’t the US?

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Online Video Moves Out of the Bedroom

July 9, 2013 Data Caps , Future of Video

Permits for online video production are up, which means the industry is coming into its own.


Last week, Los Angeles announced that “Web-Based TV” on-location film permits were up 63% compared to last year.  While that is an impressive percentage increase, the absolute number was even more striking.  In the second quarter there were 499 permit requests – compared to 381 for TV Sitcoms and 384 for TV pilots.

For an industry that is often thought of as people making videos and posting them from their bedroom, this is a number worth considering for a moment.  It means that online video production is moving into the streets – and getting bigger in the process.

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Yet More Media Consolidation is not the Cure to the Problems Caused by Media Consolidation

July 8, 2013 Competition , Future of Video

The media marketplace is dysfunctional. The way to fix it is not more of the same.


People are buzzing about possible new consolidation in the cable industry. The reason isn’t hard to see: in a market that is already very concentrated, only the strong survive. Programming costs keep rising and larger cable companies would have more leverage in negotiations against media giants like Viacom and Disney. As ISPs, larger cable companies would be better able to drive hard bargains with Internet content companies when it comes to interconnection agreements, or operate their own online video services.

But bigger is not better for the public. It would be unfortunate if, in response to problems caused by excessive concentration up and down the media landscape, yet more companies consolidate. This “if you can’t beat ’em, join ’em” approach might serve the short-term interests of shareholders but it would not be good for consumers or the market as a whole. Media consolidation inevitably leads to less choice and higher prices for consumers, and fewer outlets for independent and diverse creators.

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More Confirmation That Incumbents Restrict Online Video

June 12, 2013 Future of Video , MVPD

New comments by Time Warner Cable CEO back up what we already knew—incumbent companies are holding back video innovation.


It’s puzzling to many observers why so many programmers don’t make their content more widely available online. It seems like programmers are leaving money on the table. Shows that are available online are talked about more, watched more, and pirated less. Viewers are demanding easier access to shows that is not tethered to their home and does not require a cable subscription, yet the market is not delivering it. Why is this?

There are two big reasons. The giant content companies have a symbiotic relationship with cable. They sell programming exclusively to cable (and satellite) and charge a lot for it. This forces cable companies to raise their bills but, since they’re the only source of programming people want, they’re able to. There’s nowhere to switch to. Only now, as cable bills are reaching unsustainable levels and cable companies are seeing that online video has the technological potential to become a competitor to cable, are some cable companies finally objecting publicly.

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Retransmission Consent: Yep, Still Broken

March 27, 2013 Future of Video , MVPD

Our country’s absolutely ridiculous “retransmission consent” system continues to distort the video marketplace. This is the set of arcane rules that give local broadcasters (and not copyright holders) the right to decide whether cable systems (and IPTV and satellite providers) can carry their programming. A system that should be about connecting creators to viewers instead empowers middlemen who collect money from both sides. It’s not that distributors and other kinds of middlemen have no place–far from it. But they should add value, and be compensated accordingly.

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Senate Commerce Committee to FCC, “The Game is Changing. Are We Keeping Up?”

March 14, 2013 Broadband , DMCA , Future of Video

On Tuesday, the Senate Commerce Committee held its first FCC oversight hearing of the year.  All 5 Commissioners attended and Senators discussed their laundry list of priorities and pet projects.  While Chairman Jay Rockefeller (D-WV) pressed hard on funding for FirstNet, there were several other topics important to the public interest addressed in the hearing.

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Why Is Your Cable Bill So High?

March 7, 2013 Comcast , Competition , Future of Video

Share your cable frustrations here. The best stories will be published to this blog on Thursday, March 21!


Why is it that cable bills keep getting higher? While a lot of the blame falls on the cable industry itself, even some large cable companies can find themselves squeezed by high programming costs that they then pass along to consumers.

For years, cable prices have increased at a rate faster than inflation. According to a report released last year by the NPD group, the average cable bill (just video, not including broadband or voice) reached $86 per month. Compared to an $8 per month Netflix subscription, or an Amazon Instant Video subscription that works out to about $7 per month (and includes free shipping on actual physical goods sold by Amazon for a year), that’s a lot.

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