Items tagged "Internet Protocol"

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It’s Time to Submit Your Nominations for the 14th Annual IP3 Awards!

May 31, 2017 Information Policy , Intellectual Property , Internet Protocol , IP3 , IP3 Awards

Public Knowledge’s IP3 awards are a special occasion to honor those who have made significant contributions in the three areas of “IP”—intellectual property, information policy, and internet protocol. This year will be the fourteenth year Public Knowledge has held the awards, and now it’s time for you to submit nominations.

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White House Responds to Petition Against SOPA/PIPA

January 14, 2012 Enforcement , Innovation , Internet Protocol , Open Internet , Piracy

The White House recently released a response to two petitions protesting the Stop Online Piracy Act (SOPA). The statement agreed with the petition signers that anti-piracy laws must not increase censorship or risk security flaws by tampering with the domain name system (DNS), key parts of both SOPA and the Senate’s proposed PROTECT IP Act (PIPA). This is a fantastic sign that shows that the objections of ordinary, clued-in Internet users can make a difference in stopping misguided legislation.

The statement, co-authored by Victoria Espinel, the IP Enforcement Coordinator, Aneesh Chopra, the Chief Technology Officer, and Howard Schmidt, the Cybersecurity Coordinator, affirms the message that legislation tampering with the DNS poses real risks to the security and stability of the Internet.

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PIPA and SOPA: Compare and Contrast

January 5, 2012 DMCA , Enforcement , Internet Protocol , Protect IP Act , SOPA

I keep getting asked if the PROTECT IP Act (PIPA) is better or worse than the Stop Online Piracy Act (SOPA). Even without addressing how misleading relative terms like “better” can be, it’s impossible to give an unequivocal answer because of several significant differences between the details of the bills, even if they both do many of the same things (and do them badly).

So while both bills try to curb online infringement by tampering with the domain name system (DNS); allow private actors to de-fund targeted sites, and grant blanket immunity to certain intermediaries for taking copyright law into their own hands, each has its own peculiarities that cause additional problems.

Is PIPA worse?

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Impressions on the SOPA Markup, Thursday Evening

December 16, 2011 DMCA , Enforcement , Internet Protocol , Open Internet , Piracy

My original plan had been to write up a quick summary of today’s markup, but at this writing, the House Judiciary Committee has discussed less than half of over 50 pending proposed amendments to SOPA. However, there’s a clear trend in the committee regarding amendments—nearly every one voted on so far has been defeated.

I’d been live-tweeting a blow-by-blow of the proceedings so far, but the main takeaways from the markup are probably best recounted thematically, rather than chronologically, since a lot of themes get repeated with each amendment ‘s introduction and debate.

There’s various levels of debate being engaged in during this markup. First, there’s the discussion of the bill text. Then there’s the discussion of the bill’s effects. Third is the discussion of proponents’ and opponents’ motives.

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As AT&T Spins, Justice Should Ensure that Facts and Law Trump Politics

September 6, 2011 Antitrust , AT&T , FCC , Internet Protocol , Wireless

Last Wednesday, the Justice Department planted a very large nail in the coffin of the AT&T takeover of T-Mobile when it filed a lawsuit in the District Court for the District of Columbia Circuit to block the merger.   Deputy Attorney General James M. Cole couldn’t have been more unequivocal about how the Department views the proposed merger:

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Internet Engineers Criticize PROTECT IP DNS Plan

June 6, 2011 Enforcement , International , Internet Protocol

Recently, a group of five prominent Internet engineers released a paper detailing security and technical concerns regarding DNS filtering in rogue website legislation like the PROTECT IP Act. The paper highlights three broad sources of harm stemming from mandated DNS redirects: interference with existing DNS security measures, problems resulting from circumvention, and collateral damage from DNS interdependencies. Coupled with the ease with which DNS filtering can be circumvented, the paper shows the cost-benefit of proposals like PROTECT IP to be clearly in the red.

DNS Security

The first major problem is the tension between DNS filtering and the DNS Security Extensions, or DNSSEC.

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IP3 Awards Now Open!

April 30, 2010 Internet Protocol , IP3

The 2010 IP3 awards are almost upon us and you can help out by making a nomination. Let us know who you think should be honored for their good work in any or all of the “three IPs”: Intellectual Property, Information Policy, and Internet Protocol. The IP3 awards are our way of paying tribute to the thought leaders who inspired us and our supporters during the past year. Help us out by taking a quick minute to tell us who you think deserves an IP3 award this year.

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Standards good. Tech mandates bad.

April 29, 2010 DVR , Innovation , Internet Protocol , Set-Top Box

What exactly is the difference between a “standard” and a “tech mandate”? There was some confusion today at the House hearing on the FCC’s efforts to promote a more competitive market in home video devices. (Here’s Harold’s written testimony from the hearing.)

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DSL Was Never Regulated, Oceania Has Always Been At War With Eastasia, And My Offer To AT&T.

April 13, 2010 AT&T , Broadband , FCC , Internet Protocol , Network Neutrality

Hank Hulquist over at AT&T writes that the FCC never regulated internet access. It’s a funny thing, because I distinctly remember going through a process where the FCC reclassified DSL from a Title II telecom service to an information service. Let me rummage for a bit . . . . ah yes. Here is the link to the FCC’s 2005 Order reclassifying DSL as an “information service.” In fact, come to think of it, I’m old enough to remember when the telephone companies wanted DSL classified as an “interstate telecommunications service.” Can I find that link on line? Why yes!

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How to Preserve an Open Internet

January 15, 2010 Filtering , Innovation , Internet Protocol , Network Neutrality , Non-Discrimination

The FCC can preserve the Open Internet with the tools already at its disposal. With a coalition of other public interest groups, Public Knowledge filed comments with the FCC yesterday emphasizing the importance of the Internet, and what can be done to protect it.

Along with the Center for Media Justice, Consumers Union, Media Access Project, and New America Foundation, we dealt with the bulk of the issues raised in the FCC's Notice. We filed them in addition to comments that concern the relationship of copyright enforcement to the principles of an open Internet.

Here's what we had to say.

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