Items tagged "MPAA"

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Theater Owners Shouldn’t Count on the MPAA to “Protect Jobs”

January 25, 2012 Innovation , MPAA , SOC , SOPA , Video Innovation

Former Senator Chris Dodd has been buttering the popcorn of movie theater owners since becoming Hollywood’s chief lobbyist. So it’s not surprising to see the National Association of Theatre Owners (NATO) and the MPAA commiserating together over what happened to SOPA. They’re united in the delusion that the revolt of Internet users was started and orchestrated by Google–it’s more comforting, no doubt, to paint a large corporation as the bad guy, instead of facing up to the reality of a populist revolt against your own greed and overreach.

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SOPAStrike — The Day After

January 19, 2012 MPAA , Protect IP Act , SOPA

Yesterday was absolutely one of those days that reminds me why I stay in public advocacy. I’m a democracy junkie. Yes, I admit it. The sight of literally millions of people remembering that they are citizens and not just consumers gets me juiced.

The good news is that by every possible metric, SOPAStrike was an enormous success. We absolutely shocked the poop out of members of Congress and broke through the infamous “Washington bubble” that separates our elected officials from what is actually going on in the real world. As a result, we forced more than 20 Senators to come out publicly against PIPA/SOPA, including a number of co-sponsors withdrawing support. Fantastic!

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It worked for China, why not the United States?

December 15, 2011 MPAA , Piracy , Protect IP Act , SOPA

This is the question that is before Congress as it decides on what to do with the Domain Name Server filtering provisions in the Stopping Online Piracy Act (SOPA) and the Protect IP Act (PIPA).  Public Knowledge has advocated from the beginning against this provision because it would make the Internet less secure, sacrifice our moral high ground internationally, and to top it off it will do nothing to deter Internet piracy.  So while many would experience revulsion at the idea of adopting any tool that is used in the Great Firewall of China, the proponents of SOPA and PIPA have in fact, embraced it.

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What Warner’s Recklessness Says About SOPA

November 11, 2011 MPAA , SOPA

Warner Bros. on Monday admitted to removing content from Hotfile.com that Warner never even looked at and didn’t actually own.  The Stop Online Piracy Act (SOPA), currently pending in the House of Representatives, give companies like Warner incredible new levels of power that they have never had under the DMCA.  If Warner’s recklessness under the current legal framework shows us anything, it’s that Congress’ proposition to give these kinds of companies even greater power is about as sensible as parents giving to their teenager the keys to the brand new family car after he just got a DUI crashing the old one. 

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MPAA Urges Congress to Ignore Evidence in Favor of “Common Sense”

September 20, 2011 Enforcement , MPAA , Piracy

Today, the MPAA and other movie industry groups sent a letter to the Senate urging them to pass S. 968, the PROTECT IP Act. The letter attempts to handwave away real questions about the bill’s effects on security and free speech with some awfully weak arguments embedded within its refrains of “piracy is a problem” and “we are a big industry.”

No one contests that movies are a big industry, or that there’s a lot of infringement on the Internet. But those aren’t the questions before Congress. The question really is whether S. 968 does any net good. And from here, it certainly doesn’t look like it.

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PK In the Know Podcast

May 20, 2011 Enforcement , FCC , MPAA , Music , RIAA

On this week’s podcast we discuss increasing transparency at the FCC in light of Commissioner Baker’s announced departure to Comcast, a proposed warrantless entry law for copyright violators in California, and how you can follow in Jonathan Coulton’s successful footprints with the Creators Freedom Project co-sponsored Rock Your Net workshops.  We also discuss “nothing less than a frontal assault on academic fair use” with the Association of Research Libraries’ Brandon Butler.

You can download the audio directly by clicking here (MP3) or stream it using the player below:

Want to subscribe to our podcast? Click here for the MP3 feed.

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Three Reasons Why Google’s Censorship of “Piracy-Related Terms” is a Terrible Idea

January 27, 2011 BitTorrent , DMCA , Filtering , MPAA , Piracy

Earlier today, word spread that Google, presumably bowing to pressure from Hollywood and the recording industry, had begun blocking certain “piracy-related terms” from its autocomplete search feature. As it turns out, the terms in question are “BitTorrent,” “Rapidshare” and “Megaupload”. There are plenty of reasons why this is a terrible idea but for brevity’s sake, I will limit myself to three:

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U.S. Pushed Spain to Adopt French-Style Three Strikes Law

December 8, 2010 ACTA , MPAA , Piracy , RIAA , Three Strikes

Among the thousands of documents revealed to the press through WikiLeaks are apparently a number that deal with copyright issues. The Spanish newspaper El País has published a number of cables from the U.S. embassy in Madrid regarding U.S. efforts on IP enforcement in Spain.

One of the most interesting is this one from February 2008, which recommended that the U.S. threatened to put Spain on the Special 301naughty list” unless the Spanish government announced it would adopt a three-strikes style copyright enforcement law that would cut users off from the Internet after allegations of copyright infringement.

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Copyright Industry Calls for Censorship in the Name of Stopping Infringement

March 26, 2010 Fair Use , MPAA , Music Licensing

Public Knowledge has been attacked for allegedly saying "piracy is free speech" when we point out that hyper-aggresive copyright enforcement can have First Amendment implications. Our usual points relate to how fair use is ignored or entire categories of technologies are threatened in a ham-fisted attempt to curb online infringement.

In most of these enforcement efforts, free speech is collateral damage.

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IPEC Asks Loaded Questions, But Public Can Respond

February 25, 2010 Enforcement , MPAA

Victoria Espinel gets the Internet. From blogging on whitehouse.gov, to personally reaching out to BoingBoing, she's trying to assure the public that her office, the newly-created Intellectual Property Enforcement Coordinator (IPEC), doesn't exist to put Hollywood's or the pharmaceutical industry's interests first–rather, she sees her job as to "help protect the ideas and creativity of the American public." To that end, her office is soliciting comment from the public as to what the IPEC's priorities should be.

But outreach by itself won't lead to good policy. The Federal Register Notice the office put out asks some good questions, but plenty of loaded ones.

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