Items tagged "MPAA"

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2010 State of the Net Three Strikes Panel — what MPAA and RIAA don’t want you to know

January 28, 2010 Broadband , DMCA , Fair Use , FCC , MPAA

Yesterday, the MPAA and RIAA made a giant political misstep by refusing to participate in a debate about three strikes. In doing so, they exposed the public and a number of US policy makers to policy that would strip Internet subscribers of their constitutional due process rights.

On Tuesday and Wednesday, I attended this year's State of the Net Conference beautifully orchestrated by Tim Lordan and his crew at the Internet Caucus Advisory Committee.

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Harold on The Future of Your Cable Box on The Kojo Nnamdi Show

January 27, 2010 Analog Hole , FCC , MPAA , Network Neutrality , Plug and Play

If you were following our tweets yesterday (and don't forget to follow the tweets of our collective staff, found on this twitter list, too), you may have seen an update that PK Legal Director Harold Feld participated in a discussion about set top boxes, over-the-top Internet video, cutting the cord, and net neutrality on the Kojo Nnamdi Show. If you missed the live show, you can read the transcripts and listen to the recorded audio stream here.

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Nice Thoughts and Naughty Thoughts About Broadband

December 23, 2009 Broadband , MPAA , RIAA

Trying to figure out who's naughty and nice this time of year can be difficult. Many people are both, and figuring it all out by the end of the week will be quite the challenge.

Take for example two days last week in the life of Vice President Joe Biden. On Dec. 15, he hosted a meeting for the crème de la crème of Big Media, which by all accounts, like this one and this one brought top government officials together to focus on combating the scourge of “piracy.”

No one likes “piracy,” but this over-the-top meeting put so much of a focus on the issue, and pandered so much so the assembled multitudes that it lacked any credibility whatsoever.

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You Want Enforcement? Here’s Your Enforcement

December 4, 2009 ACTA , Enforcement , MPAA

This week, the Chicago Sun-Times reported that a 22-year old woman was arrested on charges of "criminal use of a motion picture exhibition" when she recorded two segments of the new Twilight movie, totaling four minutes of footage.

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Another Pro-ACTA Letter from MPAA, RIAA, et al.

November 20, 2009 ACTA , MPAA , RIAA , Three Strikes , Trademark

A number of movie studios, record labels, and other copyright-holding companies (and their related trade associations) have also written a pro-ACTA letter to Congress, which I first saw posted on Ben Sheffner's blog. Minus the bizarre "distraction" claim, it follows the same basic pattern—that ACTA will benefit IP businesses and do nothing harmful.

The evidence for this? Still absent. Instead, the letter reiterates that changes in technology require online copyright enforcement, and thus a section of ACTA covering the Internet.

This probably shouldn't require repeating, but I'll say it again. A solution has to be tailored to solve the problem. Is ACTA properly tailored to solve copyright infringement? No one can tell.

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Hollywood: Never Mind the Transparency, Here’s the ACTA

November 20, 2009 ACTA , Forum Shopping , MPAA , Trademark , USTR

It's not a surprise that the Motion Picture Association of America is a supporter of the so-called Anti Counterfeiting Trade Agreement, a proposed international copyright and trademark agreement that the public isn't allowed to see. What is surprising is how willing the MPAA is to dismiss calls for an open and democratic process as a "distraction."

In a letter addressed yesterday to Senator Patrick Leahy, chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee, the MPAA endorsed ACTA and then went on to say this:

Outcries on the lack of transparency in the ACTA negotiations are a distraction. They distract from the substance and the ambition of the ACTA

This is a pathetic excuse for logic.

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SOC in Context

November 9, 2009 Analog Hole , DVR , MPAA , Set-Top Box , SOC

The MPAA's attempt to get the FCC to allow Hollywood to impose Selectable Output Control (SOC) on consumers has gotten quite a bit of coverage in the tech-savvy blogosphere over the past few days.

I was reading through the comments on two prominent blogs' postings, Boing Boing's Tell the FCC to say no to Hollywood's insane "Selectable Output Control" kill-switch and Gizmodo's MPAA Still Trying to Plug Your Analog Hole with Selectable Output Control, and it appears that even among a very informed subsection of the public, SOC still causes a lot of confusion. The main point of confusion is the relationship of SOC to other forms of video DRM.

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Oh Hollywood: Netflix Profit Leaching and Longer Movie Rental Delays

October 28, 2009 Innovation , MPAA , SOC

Admittedly, we here at Public Knowledge spend a lot of time fighting with Hollywood and the MPAA. It is not that we think that the MPAA is full of bad people, just that the policies that they fight for are not always in the public interest. Of course, it is not their job to fight for the public interest – their job is to fight for movie studios. Fighting for the public interest is our job. However, sometimes the MPAA or one of its member studios says something that makes us wonder – are you even doing a good job fighting for movie studios?

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Who’s Running the Show–the FCC or Hollywood Execs?

September 21, 2009 DRM , FCC , MPAA , National Broadband Plan , Three Strikes

Last Thursday, PK President Gigi Sohn delivered a statement at an FCC broadband workshop titled “The Role of Content in the Broadband Ecosystem”. If you find yourself questioning what relevance a discussion of content protection has in the context of the National Broadband Plan, you’re not alone. In her statement (oral | written), Gigi questioned the FCC’s jurisdiction over copyright issues and asserted that the Commission certainly does not have the authority to combat online copyright infringement by using the sort of blunt instrument–solutions like copyright filtering and three strikes–that the industry is calling for. So, why even convene a workshop on content protection as part of the National Broadband Plan? The point of the workshop, it seems, was to appease the big entertainment companies that are clamoring for the Federal government to take a more active role in protecting the intellectual property of private companies. This fact could not have been made more clear by the FCC, given the manner in which the workshop was conducted. Embedded above, you’ll find a video of Frederick D. Huntsberry’s presentation from the workshop. While the time limit for oral statements was supposedly five minutes, Huntsberry, the COO of Paramount Pictures, was inexplicably allowed to give a 10 minute presentation. In a move reminiscent of the MPAA’s how-to-camcord video, Huntsberry demonstrated how to unlawfully download and/or distribute a film online (using a torrent tracker, Drop.io and a streaming site), spoke at length about camcording and insinuated that a number of legitimate companies–including Google, eBay, Apple, Twitter, Facebook and Boxee–are enabling the unlawful trade of copyrighted content online.

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Supreme Court Declines to Hear Cablevision Case: Video Providers, Consumers and Innovation all Win

June 29, 2009 DVR , Fair Use , MPAA

We just got word that the Supreme Court has declined to review the Cablevision remote DVR case. This is the case where Hollywood and some cable networks sued Cablevision for providing a TiVo-like service where the copy of the recorded program resides on the cable operator's servers rather than on a hard drive in the home. The studios claimed that both the buffer copies and the copies residing on Cablevision's servers were a violation of its right to reproduce the program, and that the recordings sent to the customer were a violation of its public performance right. A lower court in New York City sided with Hollywood, but the 2nd Circuit Court of Appeals reversed that decision, ruling that the remote DVR service did not violate Hollywood's copyrights.

The Court's decision not to take the case is a huge victory for consumers and all video service providers, not just cable.

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