Items tagged "Music Licensing"

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Campaigns, Copyrights, and Compositions: A Politician’s Guide to Music on the Campaign Trail

July 6, 2011 Music , Music Licensing

(Update [7/7/2011]: The description of Jackson Browne’s suit against former presidential candidate John McCain, and the court’s holding, were initially inaccurate. Sen. McCain’s campaign did not produce the ad [it was produced by a GOP group based in Ohio] and the court declined to rule on its fair use status. The post below has been updated accordingly.)

If you think the recent set-to between Tom Petty and GOP presidential hopeful Rep. Michele Bachmann (R-MN) sounds familiar, you’re not alone. The scuffle over Bachmann’s use of “American Girl” is hardly the first time a politician has come under fire for using a song without the artist’s permission. Backlash from angry artists has left candidates from 1996 Republican presidential nominee then-Sen.  Bob Dole (Sam & Dave’s “I’m a Soul Man” in 1996) to then-Sen. Barack Obama (again Sam & Dave, this time with “Hold On, I’m Comin’” in 2008) singing the blues. 

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On today’s podcast we update the status of the proposed AT&T/T-Mobile merger, walk through the intricacies of politicians licensing music for their campaigns, talk about IP protection surrounding attempts to 3D print a cube from the movie Super 8, and mark the death and life of social networks.  We also discuss the decision of civil society organizations to pull out of international open internet discussions at OECD and consider the ramifications of this week’s Supreme Court ruling on minors’ access to violent video games.

You can download the audio directly by clicking here (MP3) or stream it using the player below:

Want to subscribe to our podcast? Click here for the MP3 feed.

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The Bittersweet National Jukebox

May 13, 2011 Music Licensing , Orphan Works

If you have not had a chance to play with the Library of Congress’ new National Jukebox, stop reading this post and do it now.  The Jukebox is an amazing project that makes over 10,000 historic sound recordings from 1901 to 1925 available online.  These recordings, which span genres from opera to whistling (its own category) to novelty songs to speeches and everything in between, are fantastic examples of what is possible when you combine rich historical archives and the internet.  However, this project comes with a curious asterisk.

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PK In the Know Podcast

May 13, 2011 AT&T , Competition , FCC , Music Licensing , Wireless

On today’s podcast we discuss 3D/DC, the Senate hearing on the proposed AT&T/T-Mobile merger, Google’s announcement of a music service, COICA 2.0 (aka PIPA), and Microsoft’s purchase of Skype.  We also interview David Beren of TmoNews.com about how his community is reacting to the proposed merger.

You can download the audio directly by clicking here (MP3) or stream it using the player below:

Want to subscribe to our podcast? Click here for the MP3 feed.

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PK In the Know Podcast

April 15, 2011 Music , Music Licensing , Network Neutrality

On today’s podcast we discuss the nexus between Netflix, “cord nevers,” and net neutrality, the future of Spotify and music services in the United States, and 3D/DC: 3D printing comes to the Nation’s Capital.  We also interview Professor Jason Schultz about the website DoctoredReviews.com, which helps inform the public about problems with doctor-patient anti-review contracts.

You can download the audio directly by clicking here (MP3) or stream it using the player below:

Want to subscribe to our podcast? Click here for the MP3 feed.

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Despite the RIAA/NAB Unholy Alliance to Force FM Radios Into All Cell Phones, Performance Royalties

August 17, 2010 Limitations & Exceptions , Music , Music Licensing

There’s an absolutely ridiculous story making the rounds—apparently the NAB and the RIAA have come to an agreement whereby the NAB will support broadcasters paying performance royalties, in exchange for the RIAA supporting a legal requirement that cell phones, mp3 players, and the like have FM receivers built in.

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Copyright Industry Calls for Censorship in the Name of Stopping Infringement

March 26, 2010 Fair Use , MPAA , Music Licensing

Public Knowledge has been attacked for allegedly saying "piracy is free speech" when we point out that hyper-aggresive copyright enforcement can have First Amendment implications. Our usual points relate to how fair use is ignored or entire categories of technologies are threatened in a ham-fisted attempt to curb online infringement.

In most of these enforcement efforts, free speech is collateral damage.

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DRM is Dead, Long Live DRM

July 20, 2009 DMCA , DRM , Filtering , Music Licensing , Piracy

DRM is dead, or so they say. With the “big four” major labels having completely abandoned DRM protection schemes for CDs and with online music juggernaut iTunes now offering all of its music DRM-free, you might think that the era of restricted music files and rootkit fiascoes is now behind us. But you would be wrong. While DRM may be dead as far as mainstream music distribution is concerned, many labels–both major and independent–continue to utilize various forms of DRM and watermarking when distributing music in specific contexts and for certain purposes. Perhaps the most visible category among these is the pre-release promo, generally a CD or digital file sent to journalists in advance of the street date for review purposes. In an article for the Washington City Paper, music journalist Mike Riggs sheds some light on the practice of sending DRM and watermark-laden music to critics:

I had been looking forward to reviewing Depart From Me, the new album by Definitive Jux rapper Cage, since I discovered 2005’s damn-near brilliant Hell’s Winter. When the package arrived one month in advance of the street date, I set aside everything I was doing and with trembling fingers popped the promo CD of Depart From Me into the computer. And after listening to the first minute and a half of every track, I tossed the CD in the trash. Why? Because Definitive Jux, in order to keep me from leaking the album, made the review copy nearly unlistenable by inserting promo drops–breaks in the music during which a voice says, “This is a promotional copy”–on every single track.

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