Items tagged "National Broadband Plan"

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Got Questions About the National Broadband Plan? Ask FCC Chairman Julius Genachowski via YouTube

March 10, 2010 Broadband , FCC , National Broadband Plan

On Tuesday, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) will unveil its National Broadband Plan, which the agency describes as “a roadmap to connect all Americans to affordable, high-speed internet”. Public Knowledge and other stakeholders will have plenty of questions and recommendations for the FCC once the Plan is unveiled and the agency will be tasked with accommodating these comments. Additionally, the FCC is seeking input from the general public via their Broadband.gov portal. As part of this ongoing public outreach initiative, FCC Chairman Julius Genachowski will participate in a YouTube interview on Tuesday, where he will be asked questions submitted by members of the general public about broadband and the National Broadband Plan. Head over to CitizenTube to submit your questions (text or video) and vote on the submissions made by others.

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Google’s Broadband Stimulus Program

February 10, 2010 Broadband , National Broadband Plan , Network Neutrality , Network Open Access

Google's announcement that it's going to create one gigabit-per-second networks in a few selected communities looks like what the broadband stimulus program should have been – an attempt to jump start technology, to invest in new ideas and to determine how people will use advanced networks given the chance to use them.

There is no downside to the Google announcement, except perhaps from the point of view of the Federal government, which gave in to the lowest-common-denominator philosophy when structuring the stimulus program, and from the point of view of the incumbent telephone and cable carriers.

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Fairpoint and Free Market Fundamentalist Allies In Maine Try To Block Stimulus Grant.

January 4, 2010 Broadband , Competition , Municipal Wi-Fi , National Broadband Plan , Wireline

Ya know, if my state got a grant for $24.5 million to build out broadband networks in underserved areas, I would jump for joy. But I'm not in the Maine legislature, so what do I know?

Last month, NTIA gave Great Works internet in Maine $24.5 million toward a fiber optic network. The grant is a classic public/private partnership for a middle mile project that includes, among others the University of Maine.

Fairpoint, Maine's primary rural LEC, has objected to this "undue competition with the private sector." This would be funny, given how Fairpoint has become the poster child for the failure of the private sector to deliver on its big promises to rural communities. But Fairpoint's talking points have ended up in legislation filed by Maine State Senator Lisa Marrache (D-Waterville) and Maine State Rep.

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FCC Notices Flaws in the Video Device Market

December 3, 2009 National Broadband Plan , Set-Top Box

In recent days, the FCC and the Broadband Task Force have started paying attention to video devices. Today, the Commission released a Public Notice which encapsulates some of their thinking.

There is much to commend in the video devices market. Home theater PCs are becoming more accessible as the living room and the PC converge. Innovative DVRs that interact with your cable or satellite company's services, such as the TiVo and Moxi, find ways to bypass cable gatekeepers and market directly to consumers. But these examples are rare, and can face significant barriers.

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Who’s Running the Show–the FCC or Hollywood Execs?

September 21, 2009 DRM , FCC , MPAA , National Broadband Plan , Three Strikes

Last Thursday, PK President Gigi Sohn delivered a statement at an FCC broadband workshop titled “The Role of Content in the Broadband Ecosystem”. If you find yourself questioning what relevance a discussion of content protection has in the context of the National Broadband Plan, you’re not alone. In her statement (oral | written), Gigi questioned the FCC’s jurisdiction over copyright issues and asserted that the Commission certainly does not have the authority to combat online copyright infringement by using the sort of blunt instrument–solutions like copyright filtering and three strikes–that the industry is calling for. So, why even convene a workshop on content protection as part of the National Broadband Plan? The point of the workshop, it seems, was to appease the big entertainment companies that are clamoring for the Federal government to take a more active role in protecting the intellectual property of private companies. This fact could not have been made more clear by the FCC, given the manner in which the workshop was conducted. Embedded above, you’ll find a video of Frederick D. Huntsberry’s presentation from the workshop. While the time limit for oral statements was supposedly five minutes, Huntsberry, the COO of Paramount Pictures, was inexplicably allowed to give a 10 minute presentation. In a move reminiscent of the MPAA’s how-to-camcord video, Huntsberry demonstrated how to unlawfully download and/or distribute a film online (using a torrent tracker, Drop.io and a streaming site), spoke at length about camcording and insinuated that a number of legitimate companies–including Google, eBay, Apple, Twitter, Facebook and Boxee–are enabling the unlawful trade of copyrighted content online.

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FCC to World: How Should We Do This Broadband Plan?

September 10, 2009 Broadband , National Broadband Plan

Last week, the FCC held a number of workshops to start discussing how to create and implement the National Broadband Plan called for in the Stimulus Bill. The workshops brought together academics, industry representatives, and public interest groups, and gave them an opportunity to highlight issues that the FCC should consider when putting together the plan.

Benchmarks – are we there yet?

The first workshop was titled “Benchmarks” and was designed to try and understand how we will know if the National Broadband Plan is actually working.

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