Items tagged "Net Neutrality"

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We Need Title II Protections in the Uncompetitive Broadband Market

April 26, 2017 Competition , FCC , Net Neutrality , Net Neutrality in 2017 , Title II

Internet Service Providers and their allies sometimes act as though net neutrality advocates are picking on them for no good reason, as though we selected their industry out of a hat. But the internet access market is unique in several ways, which is precisely what justifies treating them as common carriers, who are obligated to offer a nondiscriminatory service on reasonable terms. Since net neutrality, which was thought to be a settled issue, has become unsettled again, it’s time to review some of the features of the broadband market that show why net neutrality rules are essential.

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EU to US: Undoing Broadband Privacy Signals U.S. Is Not Serious About Privacy Protections

April 12, 2017 Broadband Privacy , International , Net Neutrality , Privacy Shield , Safe Harbor

Last week, the European Parliament (EP) passed a resolution manifesting concern over the EU-US Privacy Shield, a legal scheme that allows American companies to transfer personal data from the European Union to the United States. In a nutshell, the EP is worried that the U.S. government doesn’t take privacy protection seriously, and the Members of the European Parliament (MEPs) make explicit reference to, among other things, the Trump administration’s undoing of the Federal Communication Commission’s broadband privacy rules.

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Line-by-line, We Corrected the Record on Broadband Privacy and Net Neutrality

April 11, 2017 Broadband Privacy , FCC , FTC , Net Neutrality , Transparency

Last week, Federal Communications Commission Chairman Ajit Pai and Federal Trade Commission Acting Chairwoman Maureen Ohlhausen co-wrote an op-ed for the Washington Post entitled “No, Republicans didn’t just strip away your Internet privacy rights.” The team at Public Knowledge was troubled by the misinformation laid out in this op-ed. Issues like broadband privacy and net neutrality have serious long-term consequences, so we felt it was important to correct the record.

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T-Mobile’s Zero-Rating of Pokémon GO Raises Questions for the Open Internet

July 20, 2016 Data Caps , Net Neutrality , Open Internet , T-Mobile , Zero Rating

Beginning yesterday, T-Mobile is offering a limited-time promotion tied to the wildly popular augmented reality game Pokémon GO, in which the mobile data used by the game will not count toward a customer’s data cap. This is yet another form of zero-rating, a practice that can raise serious concerns about competition policy, net neutrality, and consumer choice. Amidst a global Poké-craze, we shouldn’t lose sight of what this may portend for the future of the open internet. So we want to take the opportunity to raise a number of questions about this promotion which would also be important to answer for any other zero-rating service proposal. Before concluding anything about this promotion or any similar plans that may be proposed, it is important to better understand their potential dangers and benefits.

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White House Takes a Stand Against Bill Riders Targeting the FCC

June 22, 2016 FCC , Legislation , Lifeline , Net Neutrality , Unlock the Box

Members of Congress adding unnecessary policy language or amendments, known as “riders,” to government appropriations bills is nothing new; it is a well-known tactic for getting controversial policies passed. Appropriations bills provide funding to government agencies, so they must be passed by Congress in order to keep everything moving. Some members of Congress use this as a loophole to try to sneak in language or amendments that will hurt existing policies and agencies.

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The Emperor’s New Clothes: “Rate Regulation” as an Excuse to Gut FCC Consumer Protection Authority

April 6, 2016 FCC , Legislation , Net Neutrality , Rate Regulation

Recently we highlighted the rapid effort to pass H.R. 2666 (the so-called “No Rate Regulation of Broadband Internet Access Act”) as a poorly crafted effort to prohibit rate regulation. We pointed out a variety of options to mitigate the consequences of the broad sweeping language. Consequences which we allowed were perhaps unintended.

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Happy Birthday Net Neutrality! Where Do We Stand One Year Later?

February 26, 2016 FCC , Net Neutrality , Open Internet , Title II , Zero Rating

One year ago today, the Federal Communications Commission enacted the strongest net neutrality rules in history. It was a day of celebration in the Internet policy community, after a daunting year of fighting against big Internet Service Providers like Verizon and Comcast that took advantage of a court’s decision to rule against the net neutrality rules we had at that time.

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Republicans’ Latest Plan to Undermine FCC On Consumer Protection

February 10, 2016 FCC , Legislation , Net Neutrality , Open Internet , Rate Regulation

On tomorrow’s episode of Attempts to Undermine the Efficacy of the Federal Communications Commission, the House Energy and Commerce Communications Subcommittee will mark up H.R. 2666, the so called “No Rate Regulation of Broadband Internet Access Act”. Ostensibly, the one-paragraph bill appears straightforward, prohibiting the FCC from “rate regulation,” or regulating “the rates charged for broadband internet access service,” as defined by the Commission’s 2015 Open Internet Order. But in fact, the inclusion of the sweeping phrase “without regard to any other provision of law,” combined with copious remarks from last month’s hearing, make it clear that the bill is simply another effort to gut the FCC’s ability to enforce net neutrality and protect broadband subscribers from overcharges and carrier abuse.

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What to Expect When You’re Expecting Oral Arguments for Yet Another Appeal of FCC Open Internet Rule

December 3, 2015 FCC , Net Neutrality , Open Internet , Title II

This Friday, the D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals will hear oral arguments for yet another appeal of the FCC’s Open Internet rules. This time, the gloves are off as the Commission’s most recent action, the Open Internet Order of 2015, saw the FCC do what Public Knowledge has said it should have done all along by reclassifying broadband service providers as common carriers under Title II of the Communications Act. This historic decision received thunderous applause from innovators, tech companies, and millions of consumers alike, because it finally gives the FCC a solid legal basis for protecting broadband users.

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Net Neutrality in Court This Week: The Story of How We Got Here

December 2, 2015 FCC , Net Neutrality , Open Internet , Title II

Earlier this year, the Federal Communications Commission adopted new rules to ensure the Internet remains an open platform for consumers and innovators. The new rules (adopted as part of the Open Internet Order) are a capstone to over a decade of policy battles and litigation over how the FCC regulates broadband Internet service. For close observers of the net neutrality saga, this Friday brings a sense of déjà vu, as the agency again heads to Court to defend net neutrality rules at oral argument. The FCC’s relevance in the broadband era, along with how consumers, content creators, entrepreneurs, and network providers interact with each other, hangs in the balance.

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