Items tagged "News & Analysis"

Press Release

Public Knowledge Praises Orphan Works Report, Wants More Certainty

February 1, 2006 News & Analysis , Orphan Works , Press Release

Background: The U.S. Copyright Office late Tues. released its report analyzing the status of so-called "orphan works," works whose author can't be located. The report is located here: http://www.copyright.gov/orphan/. Background on the issue is on our web site here: https://www.publicknowledge.org/issues/ow.

Public Knowledge President Gigi B. Sohn today praised the U.S. Copyright Office for its report on orphan works, but said one of the key recommendations to Congress still falls short.

Read More
Press Release

Public Knowledge Asks Congress Not To Enact ‘Broadcast Flag’ Controls

January 23, 2006 Analog Hole , Broadcast Flag , News & Analysis , Press Release

Gigi B. Sohn, president of Public Knowledge, urged Congress not to limit consumer choice or hamper innovation by enacting legislation allowing the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) to implement content controls on digital TV and radio.

Read More
Press Release

Public Knowledge Says Congress Should ‘Revitalize Fair Use for the Digital Age’

November 15, 2005 Fair Use , News & Analysis , Press Release

Gigi B. Sohn, president of Public Knowledge, today called on Congress to "revitalize fair use for the digital age." Testifying at a hearing of the House Subcommittee on Commerce, Trade and Consumer Protection, Sohn said that the U.S. copyright system has traditionally relied on a balance so that creators of works get a limited monopoly on their works and individuals get "limited, but important use of copyrighted works without having to ask permission of the copyright holder."

Read More
Press Release

Public Interest and Library Groups ask for Broadcast Flag Hearings

October 6, 2005 Broadcast Flag , News & Analysis , Press Release

For Immediate Release

Today a group of nine public-interest and library groups asked congressional leaders to conduct hearings and examine the complex issues surrounding the "broadcast flag." The flag is a part of the over-the-air digital TV signal that controls whether a viewer may record a program, or otherwise store or use it.

Read More
Press Release

Public Knowledge and Consumers Union Oppose FCC Rulemaking for “Digital Radio Broadcast Flag”

April 7, 2004 Broadcast Flag , News & Analysis , Press Release

For Immediate Release

The Federal Communications Commission is due to issue a notice tomorrow (April 8) indicating its intention to consider conducting a rulemaking on copy-protection policies for Digital Audio Radio Service (DARS). The policy, if adopted, would be the radio equivalent of the TV broadcast flag.

This afternoon, Public Knowledge and Consumers Union sent letters to FCC Chairman Michael K. Powell and the other Commissioners urging the Commission to drop the DARS issue from the notice of proposed rulemaking and to consider it, if at all, as a Notice of Inquiry.

"There is no reason for the FCC to create a broadcast flag for radio. The record companies have done nothing to establish that digital radio is a potential threat to record sales or a potential source of content for Internet file-sharers," said Mike Godwin, senior technology counsel for Public Knowledge. The text of the letter follows:

Read More
Press Release

Public Knowledge Praises Colorado Governor Owens For His Veto of Colorado State DMCA Bill

May 21, 2003 Fair Use , News & Analysis , Press Release

For Immediate Release

Washington, D.C. | Public Knowledge praises Governor Owens' decision to veto Colorado H.B. 1303 one of the "State-DMCA" bills promoted by the Motion Picture Association of America (MPAA).

Read More
Press Release

Public Knowledge’s President Reacts to Peer-to-Peer Self-Help Bill

July 25, 2002 Fair Use , News & Analysis , Press Release

While enforcing the Copyright Act and preventing copyright infringement are worthy goals, Representative Berman's Peer-to-Peer Self-Help bill goes too far. Rep. Berman's bill gives the content industry great latitude to engage in harmful behavior that could affect lawful consumer activities, as well as unlawful behavior.

Read More
Post

Snowe, Dorgan and Friends Protect Internet Freedom

May 19, 2006 Network Neutrality , News & Analysis , Policy Blog

The long-awaited Net Neutrality bill from Sens. Olympia Snowe and Byron Dorgan was introduced this afternoon. They have an interesting group of cosponsors, as you can see.

Here's our take:

Public Knowledge Statement on Snowe/Dorgan legislation

Background: This afternoon, Sen. Olympia Snowe (R-ME) and Byron Dorgan (D-ND) introduced the Internet Freedom Preservation Act. The following is a statement from Gigi B. Sohn, president and co-founder of Public Knowledge.

"The legislation from Senator Snowe and Senator Dorgan will make certain that issue of Internet freedom will be front and center as the Senate Commerce Committee debates and reshapes its important telecommunications legislation. We also would like to commend the original cosponsors, Commerce Co-chairman Daniel Inouye (D-HI), and Democratic Senators Barbara Boxer (CA), a member of the Commerce Committee, as well as Ron Wyden (OR), Patrick Leahy (VT), Hillary Rodham Clinton (NY) and Barack Obama (IL).

"This legislation would preserve the open, innovative and creative Internet, much as program access rules created new competition in video programming through targeted provisions without the heavy hand of government regulation.

"As the Gun Owners of America and the Christian Coalition have recognized, the Internet benefits everyone. There is no reason this should be a partisan issue. It is a shame that more Senators from the Republican party did not feel they were able to support this legislation, which brings the issue of Internet Freedom and non-discrimination squarely into the Senate debate."

The bill as introduced, although without all the cosponsors listed, is here

Read More
Post

Clinton vs. Clintonistas

May 19, 2006 Network Neutrality , News & Analysis , Policy Blog

In the past few weeks, certain members of the former Clinton Administration have cast their lot with the telephone and cable companies in the Net Neutrality debate. Former White House Press Secretary Mike McCurry fronts for one group. Former Al Gore campaign manager Donna Brazile is working with Verizon.

Until now, the only Clintonista on our side has been Robert Reich, the former Secretary of Labor, who came out for Net Neutrality in a radio commentary.

Now, we have a real-life Clinton on our side:

May 18, 2006

Statement of Senator Hillary Rodham Clinton on Net Neutrality

Washington, DC – "I support net neutrality. The open architecture of the Internet has been the critical element that has made it the most revolutionary communications medium since the advent of the television.

Each day on the Internet views are discussed and debated in an open forum without fear of censorship or reprisal. The Internet as we know it does not discriminate among its users. It does not decide who can enter its marketplace and it does not pick which views can be heard and which ones silenced. It is the embodiment of the fundamental democratic principles upon which our nation has thrived for hundreds of years.

I have always, and will continue to strongly and unequivocally support these principles. As I have worked throughout my Senate career to make broadband access readily available throughout New York State and our nation, I believe that maintaining an open Internet coupled with more broadband access is necessary if we are to meet the promise and the potential of the Internet to disseminate ideas and information, enhance learning, education and business opportunities for all Americans and improve and uplift our citizenry.

We must embrace an open and non-discriminatory framework for the Internet of the 21st century. Therefore, it is my intention to be an original cosponsor of the Dorgan and Snowe net neutrality legislation to ensure that open, unimpaired and unencumbered Internet access for both its users and content providers is preserved as Congress debates the overhaul of our nation's telecommunications laws. Any effort to fundamentally alter the inherently democratic structure of the Internet must be rejected."

Read More
Post

Princeton Conference on Creativity & IP Law

May 19, 2006 News & Analysis , Policy Blog

I am in Princeton today at to speak at the Creativity & IP Law Conference, which is jointly sponsored by the Princeton University Center for Arts and Cultural Policy Studies and Microsoft. The conference kicked off last night with a very fun multimedia talk by Larry Lessig about the difference between "Read-Only" and "Read-Write" cultures, and how copyright law fits the first very nicely and the second not so well. Some of his examples of the R-W culture, which for lay people is stuff like mash-ups and user generated video and music, were hysterical. Two of my favorites are "Brokeback to the Future", and George Bush and Tony Blair lip-synching Endless Love. Hadn't seen that last one before. Lots of great folks here, including Yocahi Benkler, Jessica Litman, Chris Sprigman and Ed Felten.

Read More