Items tagged "Non-Discrimination"

Press Release

Public Knowledge Urges HUD to Help Consumers Access Data Used in Algorithmic Housing Decisions

October 21, 2019 algorithmic risk assessment , algorithms , artificial intelligence , disparate impact liability , HUD , Non-Discrimination

Last week, Public Knowledge submitted comments to the Department of Housing and Urban Development on its proposed changes to civil rights law, specifically disparate impact liability, which would make it more difficult for consumers to access the data they need to appeal housing decisions made by algorithms. 

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Press Release

Public Knowledge Condemns Fox Internet Blocking

October 16, 2010 Network Neutrality , Non-Discrimination , Press Release

The following statement is attributed to Gigi B. Sohn, president and co-founder of Public Knowledge:

“Fox has said it is not allowing customers of Cablevision’s Internet access service to connect to Fox Web sites or to Fox content on Hulu.com.

“It’s bad enough that millions of consumers in New York and Philadelphia are being deprived of programming distributed by cable.  Blocking Web sites, however, is totally out of bounds in a dispute like this.

“This case shows the dangers of unchecked media consolidation and of a retransmission consent regime badly in need of reform.  Consumers should not have their access to Web content threatened because a giant media company has a dispute over cable programming carriage.  The anti-competitive aspects, particularly when it comes to online video programming, are glaringly obvious.

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Press Release

Public Knowledge Asks Investigations of Time Warner Terms of Service

June 1, 2009 Network Neutrality , Non-Discrimination , Press Release

The following statement is attributed to Gigi B. Sohn, president and co-founder of Public Knowledge:

“It is unfortunate that just as President Obama was reinforcing his commitment to Net Neutrality, Time Warner was publishing new Terms of Service that raises serious questions about the company’s commitment to an Internet free of discrimination.

“The new TOS carves out for Time Warner the right to use any amount of bandwidth the company chooses for its services, but puts its customers at risk if they use the Internet for services that may compete with Time Warner, such as video or telephone-like services.

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Post

The Good, the Bad and the Ugly of the Net Neutrality Oral Argument

September 12, 2013 Broadband Authority , FCC , Network Neutrality , Non-Discrimination , Open Internet

If Monday’s net neutrality oral argument in the DC Circuit foreshadowed the court’s decision, opponents and supporters of the FCC’s rules will each have something to cheer and something to fear. 


While some have portrayed the likely outcome of Monday’s DC Circuit oral argument on Verizon’s challenge to the Federal Communications Comission’s Open Internet order as a victory for anti-net neutrality forces and a loss for its supporters, the reality is much more complicated.   With the caveat that one can never rarely predict the ultimate outcome of a case – particularly one as difficult and multi-layered as this one – based solely on the oral argument, there are some pretty clear takeaways, some good, some bad and some just plain ugly.  For a comprehensive report on what happened in the courtroom, read Harold’s excellent blog post.

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Post

A Network Neutrality Meme That Will Not Go Away

September 26, 2012 FCC , Network Neutrality , Non-Discrimination , Open Internet , Verizon

Recently, arguments against network neutrality as a “solution in search of a problem” have resurfaced (recently subscribed to by Mitt Romney’s campaign, recently argued by Verizon in its challenge to the Open Internet Order, and also argued here and here). People who make this argument essentially claim either (1) discrimination predicted by Public Knowledge (and the FCC) will never actually come to pass, or (2) discrimination can be benign or even beneficial.

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Post

PK In The Know Podcast: Regulating Networks and a Creators’ Freedom Project Update

April 13, 2012 Last Mile , Monopoly , Network Neutrality , Network Open Access , Non-Discrimination

On this week’s podcast we consider how to think about regulating networks, opportunities for boutique ISPs, and get an update on the Creators’ Freedom Project.

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Post

Michael Powell Works the Ref On The XBox360 Play

March 29, 2012 MVPD , Network Neutrality , Non-Discrimination , Open Internet , Set-Top Box

Michael Powell, former Chairman of the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) and now the head of the National Cable Telecommunications Association (NCTA), professes confusion and consternation at our raising the alarm about Comcast’s decision to exempt its Xfinity app for the XBox360 from its 250 GB bandwidth cap. Rather than addressing the issue, Powell basically argues that the only reason PK (or anyone else) could possibly see anything here to worry about is because we’re either crazy alarmists or because we are “trying to get another bite at the regulatory apple.” In sports, we refer to this kind of behavior as ‘working the ref.’ 

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Post

SOPA: Immunity for Net Neutrality Violations?

November 8, 2011 Network Neutrality , Non-Discrimination , Open Internet , Protect IP Act , SOPA

One of the most dangerous aspects of SOPA is that its expansiveness means that it starts to interfere with all sorts of other areas of law.

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Post

Public Knowledge Urges FCC to Prevent Future BART-like Shutdowns

August 29, 2011 Jamming , Mobile Communication , Non-Discrimination , Public Safety , Radio Interference

Today, Public Knowledge, joined by a wide variety of consumer, civil rights, and civil liberties groups, urged the FCC to immediately pass rules that would prevent local authorities from ordering a shutdown of wireless services the way that BART did earlier this month. As Harold’s earlier blog post points out, we don’t even need to get to the (extremely pressing and important) First Amendment issues to find that BART’s actions violated the law—the Communications Act, to be precise.

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Post

Dear Game Developers: A How-To Guide for Implementing Anti-Resale Tech Without Making Everyone Want

August 1, 2011 Competition , Non-Discrimination

One of the biggest pieces of news in the gaming industry this past month involved Resident Evil: The Mercenaries 3D, a title released for Nintendo’s new 3DS handheld system. The game itself was not that unusual; at first blush, it’s just your typical “run around shooting zombies” affair. What got everyone talking (and some others very, very upset) was a feature developer Capcom put in the game, acknowledged only in small print in the game’s instruction manual: In RE: The Mercenaries 3D, once the player initially boots up the game, his/her progress is automatically recorded to the game card and cannot be deleted. Ever.

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