Items tagged "Non-Discrimination"

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Why A Small Thing Like Wireless Radio Design Can Really Screw Things Up

April 30, 2010 Network Open Access , Non-Discrimination , Public Safety , Spectrum Licensing , Wireless

Today, on behalf of the Public Interest Spectrum Coalition, Public Knowledge filed comments with the FCC about the plans to build wireless chipsets for the 700 MHz band, the band that is going to be important to the deployment of 4G service.  While that might sound as boring and technical as boring and technical can be, it actually has some very important and straightforward real world ramifications.

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Preempt State Broadband Reporting Requirements? Under What Authority?

April 28, 2010 Broadband , FCC , Mapping , Network Neutrality , Non-Discrimination

Sometime back, I coined the term “Cassandrafreude.”  A compound of “Cassandra” and “schadenfreude,” it means “the bitter pleasure derived from seeing someone else suffer in the way you predicted even though you are getting screwed yourself.” 

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Princeton Shows How “Reasonable Network Management” Would Work — Without Being Subject To NN.

April 22, 2010 FCC , Network Neutrality , Non-Discrimination , Wireless

Once again, I get to trumpet the enlightenment of my alma mater, Princeton University (Go Tigers!).

 

As detailed in this piece, iPads had a problem that started bringing down Princeton’s wifi network. So Princeton blocked the iPads, diagnosed the problem, published the details of the problem and acted in an open and transparent manner, developed a work around, published the work around, allowed any iPad that implemented the work around to reconnect, and is now working with Apple to share the work around with everyone.

 

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RCN Settlement Demonstrates the Perils of ISP Self-Regulation

April 20, 2010 BitTorrent , Network Neutrality , Non-Discrimination , P2P , Regulatory Reform

When the D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals called into question the FCC’s ability to protect broadband users earlier this month, the ongoing debate about the legal classification of broadband services took on a new urgency. While we’ve argued that the Commission should waste no time in reclassifying broadband as a “telecommunications” (Title II) service, others have suggested that no action from the Commission is necessary, seeing how Comcast’s blocking of BitTorrent was an isolated act that no other ISP is likely to emulate. As if on cue, cable provider RCN has provided us with a timely reminder that Comcast isn’t the only ISP that has stood accused of blocking its users’ traffic. In a proposed settlement for a suit brought against the ISP for throttling its users’ peer-to-peer traffic, RCN is not only not held accountable for its actions, it’s also not prohibited from using similar network management techniques in the future. As this series of events demonstrates, if we’re going to rely on the ISPs to self-regulate, we might as well kiss the open Internet goodbye.  

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Skype’s Crippled Verizon App and the Case for Wireless Net Neutrality

March 29, 2010 FCC , Mobile Communication , Network Neutrality , Non-Discrimination , Reasonable Network Management

Last week we released a video (embedded above) illustrating how the potentially awesome Skype app for the Droid is actually an epic fail of a shell game. For those of you that missed it, the Verizon Wireless mobile version of Skype, the program that lets you make free and low cost calls over the Internet, actually uses Verizon’s voice network to make calls. Furthermore, it prevents you from connecting to a WiFi hotspot in order to use the Internet to connect.

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ACTA Makes ISPs An Offer They Can’t Refuse

February 22, 2010 DMCA , Filtering , Forum Shopping , International , Non-Discrimination

The leaked ACTA Internet chapter has a footnote that says an ISP can only hang on to its "safe harbor" by implementing certain policies designed to discourage the use of their networks for copyright infringement, and that "An example of such a policy is providing for the termination in appropriate circumstances of subscriptions and accounts in the service provider's system or network of repeat infringers." Three strikes and you're out.

USTR's claim that ACTA wouldn't "change" US law is plausible (if not comforting). Similar language is already part of US law (17 U.S.C. 512 §(i)(1)(A))–as is the Fifth Amendment to the US Constitution, of course, which assures that no person can be "deprived of life, liberty, or property, without due process of law." One would hope that, like the existing statute, the ACTA language will be read in the context of the Constitution, which assures that mere accusations of copyright infringement are not enough to kick someone off the Internet. One would also hope that other countries, if they end up agreeing to a version of ACTA with this language, also understand that a "repeat infringer" must have been afforded due process.

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How to Preserve an Open Internet

January 15, 2010 Filtering , Innovation , Internet Protocol , Network Neutrality , Non-Discrimination

The FCC can preserve the Open Internet with the tools already at its disposal. With a coalition of other public interest groups, Public Knowledge filed comments with the FCC yesterday emphasizing the importance of the Internet, and what can be done to protect it.

Along with the Center for Media Justice, Consumers Union, Media Access Project, and New America Foundation, we dealt with the bulk of the issues raised in the FCC's Notice. We filed them in addition to comments that concern the relationship of copyright enforcement to the principles of an open Internet.

Here's what we had to say.

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Hey FCC: Don’t Sacrifice Network Neutrality to Content Owners

January 14, 2010 FCC , Filtering , Network Neutrality , Non-Discrimination , Piracy

In addition to our larger Network Neutrality comments, today Public Knowledge, along with Computer and Communications Industry Association, Consumer Electronics Association, Electronic Frontier Foundation, Home Recording Rights Coalition, and NetCoalition, filed a short comment with the FCC focusing on how copyright fits in with Network Neutrality.

Or more specifically, how copyright doesn’t fit in with Network Neutrality. As EFF has been pointing out with its Real Net Neutrality Campaign, the proposed rules have a gaping “copyright loophole.” They exempt any activity designed to block copyright infringement from Network Neutrality rules.

This is a problem.

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Speakeasy Gives Notice It Will Block Calls, FCC Needs To Take Action.

October 1, 2009 FCC , Non-Discrimination

Google is always a trend setter. Sadly, in this case, the trend is the refusal to complete calls to certain free conference call or free porn sites. Now Speakeasy.com has decided to do the same. Unless the FCC acts quickly, I expect other VOIP providers to follow this trend.

As I explained when this first came up, for various reasons, phone networks in rural areas get paid much more money when a call comes from another network and terminates on the rural network. This means if you have a business where lots of people call in and few people call out, you can make money from the uneven compensation.

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Fun Event On Capital Hill Next Monday: I Take On The Neocons On BB Policy

July 10, 2009 Antitrust , Broadband , Network Neutrality , Network Open Access , Non-Discrimination

One of the fun things here in D.C. is getting to go to events that are (a) informative on issues, and (b) offer a free lunch. Such is the Broadband Competition Panel sponsored by The Technology Policy Institutenext Monday, July 13, at Noon (for details, follow this link).

TPI has a fairly antiregulatory/UofC/"Free Market" bend to it. Happily, the event organizer, friend and occasional sparring partner Scott Wallsten, likes panels where folks get to mix it up a bit rather than panels where everyone agrees.

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