Items tagged "Open Access to Research"

Press Release

Save Our Spectrum Coalition Praises FCC Actions on Spectrum Auction

April 27, 2007 Network Neutrality , Open Access to Research , Press Release , Spectrum Reform

For Immediate Release

The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) should be commended for taking the first procedural steps to help consumers by enabling high-speed Internet services to use the spectrum now occupied by television stations.

Technically, the FCC decided to put out for comment a range of proposals suggested by the Coalition, including making spectrum available to many service providers and using bidding techniques in an auction that would reduce the influence of existing cellular providers. Both FCC Chairman Kevin Martin and Commissioner Jonathan Adelstein mentioned the suggestions made by the six-member public interest coalition in filings earlier this month. The members of the coalition are: Public Knowledge, Media Access Project, Consumers Union, Consumer Federation of America, New America Foundation and Free Press.

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Press Release

Public Knowledge Endorses Cornyn Bill To Expand Taxpayer Access

May 2, 2006 News & Analysis , Open Access to Research , Press Release

For Immediate Release

Background: Sen. John Cornyn (R-Tex.) and Sen. Joseph Lieberman (D-Conn.) today introduced (or announced) legislation that would give taxpayers access to billions of dollars of research for which they have already paid. The bill would expand the limited, voluntary program at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) which simply requests that researchers doing work funded by taxpayers post their work online. The bill would strengthen and expand the policy pioneered by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to provide free online access to publicly-funded research. The NIH asks its grantees to agree to free online access, but the new Cornyn-Lieberman bill would require it and extend the policy beyond the NIH to other federal funding agencies.

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Press Release

Public Knowledge Disappointed In New Open Access Policy

February 3, 2005 Open Access to Research , Press Release

For Immediate Release

Background: Secretary of Health and Human Services Michael Leavitt today announced his department's policy on open-access publishing of government-funded research. The policy requests the authors of scientific papers to make their work available for free, online as soon as possible and within 12 months of the official date of publication.

Statement of Peter Suber, director of Public Knowledge's Open Access Project:

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Post

The Digital Public Library Of America: How Would You Like To Access Online Resources?

October 25, 2011 Innovation , Open Access to Research

It was suggested that a Scannebago should be driving around the United States scanning public library works to make them available online. (I envision the Scannebago as a cross between a Winnebago, a Google Street View car and the pickup truck from Twister, but you might picture a more creative image.) Regardless of the process, many public libraries have scanned works over the past few years and now it is time to organize the digital works for public access across the country—and eventually internationally. Last year, the Berkman Center for Internet and Technology, with funding from the Alfred P.

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Post

A Perfect Storm of Bad Copyright Legislation

September 10, 2008 Broadcast Flag , DTV , Open Access to Research

Here at PK, we've been keeping our heads down the past few days, trying to fight against some really bad legislation. Once we finally get word of one, another one popped up. There are three in all (so far) are four (another was introduced during the writing of this post!!!) and we're going to need your help to put them away.

S. 3325, The Enforcement of Intellectual Property Rights Act of 2008

First up is the Senate's version of the House's PRO-IP bill, S. 3325, “The Enforcement of Intellectual Property Rights Act of 2008.” Rashmi's written a good breakdown of the differences between the bills, but that analysis may not hold up for long as we're hearing that, as you read this, a deal may have been made to nix the differences between the bills so a compromise can be passed with ease.

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Post

On the Civil Society Seoul Declaration

June 23, 2008 DRM , Internet Protocol , Network Neutrality , Open Access to Research , Public Domain

For the past couple of days, I've been in South Korea, attending the OECD's Ministerial on the Future of the Internet Economy. Rather than try to give a blow-by-blow account, I've tried to package some of my thoughts in a series of posts. Here's one:

The OECD Ministerial has ended with the signing of the Seoul Declaration, a document signed by the member nations of the OECD, as well as the European Community and observer countries Chile, Egypt, Estonia, India, Indonesia, Israel, Latvia, Senegal and Slovenia.

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Post

The PISC Posse Rides Again: M2Z And The Search for Open Spectrum

August 29, 2007 FCC , Open Access to Research , Spectrum Reform

Sometime back, on my regular blog, I wrote about a company called M2Z and their quest to get a free nationwide 20 MHz license. In exchange, they promised free (filtered) broadband (well, 384 MBPS) for everyone, a faster subscription tier (with opt out on the filtering), and a bunch of other things — notably a commitment to net neutrality, a general commitment to wholesale, and a flavor of open device attachment/wireless Carterfone.

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Post

Both Sides Get Busy In Preparation for Draft of 700 MHz Spectrum Auction Rules

July 9, 2007 FCC , Network Neutrality , Open Access to Research , Policy Blog , Spectrum Reform

Congress Daily (subscription required) is reporting that FCC Chairman Martin will issue a draft of the 700 MHz rules this week. As can be expected from such a high profile matter, rumors are flying about what will and will not be in this "Chairman's Draft." One of my colleagues describes the release of the draft like being in the 7th inning of a 9-inning baseball game – if you are winning in the 7th inning, you feel pretty good about your chances. If you are not…then you know you have to pull out all the stops to be victorious. This might include bringing pressure to bear from members of Congress, calling on the netroots and blogosphere to weigh in, and ramping up pressure on the mainstream media to cover the issue.

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The Public Knowledge blog is a great source for up-to-date information on key communications and copyright issues. But if you haven't been reading it forever, well, it can be a little hard to jump in. Here, then, is a primer on some of the issues we've been working on, what's new, and why you should care.

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According to Michael Geist Canada is also planning a major spectrum auction for 2008. And, like here, the mainstream media have about zero interest in covering it. Not only do they have the spectrum auction discussed by Geist coming up, but they will then have their own spectrum auction for broadcast spectrum when they do their transition to digital television.

I hope folks in Canada are paying attention to our current spectrum auction fights down here. In the past, I've often felt that Canada has done a better job than we have of resisting the blandishments of industry when setting its various intellectual property, privacy, and telecom policies. I hope the CRTC (Canada's version of the FCC) and, more importantly, Canadian civil society, watch our public debate and feel inspired to have a public debate about this themselves.

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