Items tagged "Open Internet"

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Public Knowledge Joins Global Net Neutrality Coalition and Global Net Neutrality Website

December 3, 2014 International , Net Neutrality , Open Internet

As the push for creating strong net neutrality rules here in the United States grows with millions of Americans voicing their support, you probably won’t be surprised to hear that net neutrality has quickly blossomed in the global open Internet debate.

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FCC Roundtable Roundup

October 10, 2014 FCC , Net Neutrality , Open Internet , Title II

Over the past month, the Federal Communication Commission (FCC) has hosted panels to publicly discuss the various elements of net neutrality. The Chairman and Commissioners did not take them lightly; the FCC held over six different panels on four different days, totaling more than 24 hours of straight net neutrality talk. Chairman Wheeler actively participated in all, either in person or through Twitter questions.

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Reliability Rather Than Rainbows: Why Strong Title II Remains the Best Option For an Open Internet

September 25, 2014 FCC , Net Neutrality , Open Internet , Title II

Earlier this week, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) published a blog post describing the “rainbow of policy and legal options” available to protect the open Internet, contrasting them to other “monochromatic options.”

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The Good, the Bad and the Ugly of the Net Neutrality Oral Argument

September 12, 2013 Broadband Authority , FCC , Network Neutrality , Non-Discrimination , Open Internet

If Monday’s net neutrality oral argument in the DC Circuit foreshadowed the court’s decision, opponents and supporters of the FCC’s rules will each have something to cheer and something to fear. 


While some have portrayed the likely outcome of Monday’s DC Circuit oral argument on Verizon’s challenge to the Federal Communications Comission’s Open Internet order as a victory for anti-net neutrality forces and a loss for its supporters, the reality is much more complicated.   With the caveat that one can never rarely predict the ultimate outcome of a case – particularly one as difficult and multi-layered as this one – based solely on the oral argument, there are some pretty clear takeaways, some good, some bad and some just plain ugly.  For a comprehensive report on what happened in the courtroom, read Harold’s excellent blog post.

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Sorting out the past 36 hours at the WCIT

December 13, 2012 Broadband , International , ITU , Open Internet

Anyone following the International Telecommunications Union (ITU) World Conference on International Telecommunications (WCIT) over the last 36 hours knows this has become a moment of high drama around the International Telecommunications regulations (ITRs) and the role of the ITU for internet-related issues.

Unfortunately, that is probably the only thing anyone can say for certain. Even the member states on the ground have expressed confusion on critical matters, such as whether the widely reported “vote” on a resolution that included express language relating to the internet was really a vote or not. 

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Amicus Briefs Counter Verizon’s First Amendment Argument in Verizon v. FCC

November 19, 2012 FCC , Open Internet , Verizon

Last week Public Knowledge and the Open Internet Coalition submitted an “intervenor’s brief” in support of the open internet rules in Verizon v. FCC. Along with our brief, other allied parties including Columbia Law Professor Tim Wu, the Center for Democracy and Technology, and several former FCC commissioners offered “friend of the court” briefs, or “amicus briefs,” in favor of the FCC.

Verizon claims it has the First Amendment right to edit, prioritize, or block its customers’ access to the internet. Verizon’s First Amendment argument plays an interesting role in the case, to which each responded in the following three briefs.

Tim Wu’s Amicus Brief

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PK In The Know Podcast: DISH, Data Caps, and Net Neutrality

November 16, 2012 Data Caps , Fair Use , Open Internet

On today’s podcast we discuss your right to skip commercials, measuring data caps, and ISP’s right to free speech.

 

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Click here to download the file for this week’s podcast directly.

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Public Knowledge Joins Intervenors in Case Supporting Open Internet Rules

November 16, 2012 Network Neutrality , Open Internet

Today, Public Knowledge joined with technology companies and state consumer advocates to defend the FCC’s open Internet rules against a challenge by Verizon and MetroPCS. The brief for these intervenors was prepared by the Open Internet Coalition (which includes Amazon, eBay, DISH Network, Facebook, Google, Paypal, Skype, Netflix, and others), Vonage, Public Knowledge, and the National Association of State Utility Consumer Advocates (“NASUCA”).

At stake are the FCC’s open Internet rules, designed to protect net neutrality. Verizon has raised a host of arguments against them, saying, for instance, that the FCC lacks the authority to issue the rules, and that the rules infringe upon telephone companies’ rights of free speech.

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PK In The Know Podcast: ATT, Facetime, and 2012 Election

November 9, 2012 AT&T , Competition , Fair Use , Future of Video , Open Internet

On this week’s podcast we discuss ATT opening up on Facetime, the future of telephone networks, and, of course, what the election means for the internet.

Listen to Podcast

Subscribe to the podcast on iTunes here.
Subscribe to the podcast via the .xml here.
Click here to download the file for this week’s podcast directly.

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What the Election Means for the Internet

November 7, 2012 Kirtsaeng , Network Neutrality , Open Internet , Orphan Works , SOPA

After nearly two years of debates, never-ending commercials, donation solicitations and ever-present polling, Election Day is over and the results are in.  As many had predicted, the balance of government has not changed significantly.  Democrats will retain the Presidency and control of the Senate, and Republicans will continue to control the House, albeit by a slightly smaller margin than before.

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