Items tagged "Open Internet"

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Lofgren’s Task Force on the Global Internet

September 28, 2012 Enforcement , International , Open Internet

There has been a flurry of activity around Internet freedom recently. Not only have both parties included it in their platform, but Rep. Zoe Lofgren has taken an affirmative step in its favor by proposing the Global Free Internet Act of 2012, H.R. 6530 (a predecessor bill called the “One Global Internet Act” was proposed by Lofgren in 2010 with bipartisan support). The newly proposed bill does not directly change substantive law.

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A Network Neutrality Meme That Will Not Go Away

September 26, 2012 FCC , Network Neutrality , Non-Discrimination , Open Internet , Verizon

Recently, arguments against network neutrality as a “solution in search of a problem” have resurfaced (recently subscribed to by Mitt Romney’s campaign, recently argued by Verizon in its challenge to the Open Internet Order, and also argued here and here). People who make this argument essentially claim either (1) discrimination predicted by Public Knowledge (and the FCC) will never actually come to pass, or (2) discrimination can be benign or even beneficial.

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We Stand for a Free and Open Internet: The Declaration of Internet Rights

July 2, 2012 Innovation , Open Internet , SOPA

Public Knowledge is excited to be part of the 91 organizations and 38 influencers signing on to the Declaration of Internet Freedom, which launched today.

As Cory Doctorow succinctly put it, “There is no copyright policy, only Internet policy; there is no Internet policy, only policy.” Today’s focus on increased IP enforcement will have a dramatic impact on the way people interact with the most democratic communications platform that has ever existed: the internet. Disproportionate IP enforcement will stifle creativity and create gatekeepers that block the free flow of information online.

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Civil Society is Key to the Debate on International Control Over the Internet

June 4, 2012 Broadband , International , ITU , Open Internet

Civil society will be the critical player in a policy debate that has dominated recent tech news – whether the International Telecommunication Union (ITU) will be given the power by its Member States to regulate internet access and the internet itself.   Despite the fact that the US Government and US industry have vocally opposed this outcome, it is US civil society that has the biggest role to play to ensure that the Internet continues to be open and decentralized.

The ITU is a United Nations agency focused on setting international standards related to information and communications technologies – and whose stated mission is to connect all the world’s people “wherever they live and whatever their means.”  Among other things, the ITU allocates global radio spectrum, and coordinates the assignment of satellite orbits. 

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Michael Powell Works the Ref On The XBox360 Play

March 29, 2012 MVPD , Network Neutrality , Non-Discrimination , Open Internet , Set-Top Box

Michael Powell, former Chairman of the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) and now the head of the National Cable Telecommunications Association (NCTA), professes confusion and consternation at our raising the alarm about Comcast’s decision to exempt its Xfinity app for the XBox360 from its 250 GB bandwidth cap. Rather than addressing the issue, Powell basically argues that the only reason PK (or anyone else) could possibly see anything here to worry about is because we’re either crazy alarmists or because we are “trying to get another bite at the regulatory apple.” In sports, we refer to this kind of behavior as ‘working the ref.’ 

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White House Responds to Petition Against SOPA/PIPA

January 14, 2012 Enforcement , Innovation , Internet Protocol , Open Internet , Piracy

The White House recently released a response to two petitions protesting the Stop Online Piracy Act (SOPA). The statement agreed with the petition signers that anti-piracy laws must not increase censorship or risk security flaws by tampering with the domain name system (DNS), key parts of both SOPA and the Senate’s proposed PROTECT IP Act (PIPA). This is a fantastic sign that shows that the objections of ordinary, clued-in Internet users can make a difference in stopping misguided legislation.

The statement, co-authored by Victoria Espinel, the IP Enforcement Coordinator, Aneesh Chopra, the Chief Technology Officer, and Howard Schmidt, the Cybersecurity Coordinator, affirms the message that legislation tampering with the DNS poses real risks to the security and stability of the Internet.

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Impressions on the SOPA Markup, Thursday Evening

December 16, 2011 DMCA , Enforcement , Internet Protocol , Open Internet , Piracy

My original plan had been to write up a quick summary of today’s markup, but at this writing, the House Judiciary Committee has discussed less than half of over 50 pending proposed amendments to SOPA. However, there’s a clear trend in the committee regarding amendments—nearly every one voted on so far has been defeated.

I’d been live-tweeting a blow-by-blow of the proceedings so far, but the main takeaways from the markup are probably best recounted thematically, rather than chronologically, since a lot of themes get repeated with each amendment ‘s introduction and debate.

There’s various levels of debate being engaged in during this markup. First, there’s the discussion of the bill text. Then there’s the discussion of the bill’s effects. Third is the discussion of proponents’ and opponents’ motives.

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SOPA: Immunity for Net Neutrality Violations?

November 8, 2011 Network Neutrality , Non-Discrimination , Open Internet , Protect IP Act , SOPA

One of the most dangerous aspects of SOPA is that its expansiveness means that it starts to interfere with all sorts of other areas of law.

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