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PK In the Know Podcast

July 8, 2011 Broadband , Competition , Fiber , Last Mile , Safe Harbor

On today’s podcast, we walk through the agreement on online copyright infringement between ISPs and content holders, the data portability spat between Facebook and Google, and get a primer on using music on the campaign trail.  We also discuss the benefits and challenges of building local community networks with Christopher Mitchell of the Institute for Local Self Reliance and muninetworks.org.

You can download the audio directly by clicking here (MP3) or stream it using the player below:

Want to subscribe to our podcast? Click here for the MP3 feed.

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COICA v. 2.0: the PROTECT IP Act

May 12, 2011 Choke Points , DMCA , Enforcement , Piracy , Safe Harbor

The Senate is gearing up for another go-round on rogue websites legislation, and this time, they’ve jettisoned the “COICA” label in favor of calling it the “PROTECT IP Act.” Like a summer blockbuster sequel, it tightens up some things, adds a few new villains, but in the end reprises the same general plot.

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Sheet Music Domain Goes Down Over Bogus Copyright Claim

April 22, 2011 DMCA , Enforcement , Public Domain , Safe Harbor

Yesterday, IMSLP, a website dedicated to archiving public domain sheet music lost its domain name due to a complaint sent by the UK’s Music Publishers Association to the site’s registrar, GoDaddy. The notice incorrectly claimed that IMSLP’s copy of Rachmaninoff’s The Bells infringed copyright. (Coverage by TorrentFreak, Michael Geist, and BoingBoing.)

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Court Tosses $1B Sought by Viacom from YouTube

June 23, 2010 DMCA , Filtering , Safe Harbor

A decision from a federal district court in New York today affirmed that online hosts shouldn’t have to pay if their users are infringing. The opinion, issued by Judge Louis Stanton of the Southern District of New York, found on summary judgment that Google and YouTube qualified for the safe harbors of the Digital Millennium Copyright Act. By acting to take down infringing postings when it was notified of them, YouTube was able to meet the standards of the law, despite the fact that Viacom complained that YouTube generally knew that infringing works were on the site.

 

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Landmark Australian Ruling Deals a Blow to Three Strikes Down Under

February 4, 2010 BitTorrent , DMCA , Filtering , Safe Harbor , Three Strikes

For those of us who believe that the Internet should remain an open, democratic and non-discriminatory platform, with few exceptions, the last two years have brought a steady stream of bad news from Down Under. First, there were rumblings that Australia was seeking to implement a “three strikes” policy toward those accused of online filesharing. Next, New Zealand came close to instituting its own three strikes mandate, though thanks to the efforts of activists, that deeply-flawed law was struck down at the last minute. Finally, after a number of previous, failed attempts, the Australian government announced that it plans to mandate the use of real-time filtering technologies on public ISPs sometime during the next year. Just when it seemed like no one in the Australian and New Zealand governments appreciated the damaging effects of such policies, an Australian federal court judge has ruled that the ISP iiNet is not responsible for the actions of its subscribers. In the landmark ruling (full text here), which will likely have ramifications in the U.S. and elsewhere, the judge rebuffs Hollywood’s attempt to require iiNet to act as a copyright cop, dealing a blow to three strikes in the process. Let’s take a closer look.

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