Items tagged "Spectrum Reform"

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A Shared Resource Like Unlicensed Spectrum Needs Technologies That Know How to Share

September 1, 2015 FCC , LTE-U , Spectrum Reform , Unlicensed Spectrum , Wi-Fi

Unlicensed spectrum is not the “Wi-Fi band”: it’s open for any person and any device to use, for any (legal) purpose, and it’s open to a wide variety of technologies.

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LTE-U Can Harm Consumers, but Only If the FCC Allows It

September 1, 2015 FCC , LTE-U , Spectrum Reform , Unlicensed Spectrum , Wi-Fi

Unlicensed spectrum has never been more popular! The reason people love unlicensed spectrum is because it is the “public commons” of spectrum that is open to anyone to use and has led to innovations that people use every day. Technologies such as Bluetooth, cordless phones, baby monitors, and Wi-Fi all come from use of unlicensed spectrum, and we expect to see many new innovations in the near future as a result of unlicensed spectrum, such as self-driving cars.

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The Internet of Things and the Importance of Unlicensed Spectrum

August 5, 2015 FCC , Internet of Things , Spectrum Auction , Spectrum Reform , Unlicensed Spectrum

On July 29, the Senate Commerce Committee held a hearing on “Wireless Broadband and the Future of Spectrum Policy,” where Ranking Member Bill Nelson observed, “[t]oday, there are more wireless devices in this country than there are people.”

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World Radio Conference Must Tackle Spectrum Availability

August 3, 2015 ITU , Spectrum Reform

The World Radio Conference (WRC) is approaching and the International Telecommunications Union (ITU) is at the center of our attention. Once again, the future of how countries share a very essential resource – spectrum – is a core agenda topic for negotiations.

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DISH, the Spectrum Auction, and the Wrath of Commissioner Pai

February 3, 2015 FCC , Spectrum , Spectrum Auction , Spectrum Reform

Commissioner Ajit Pai is outraged! This in itself would not be news. Sadly, Commissioner Pai seems to spend most of his time these days outraged — usually while denouncing his Democratic colleagues on the supposed death of collegiality at the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) (we will pause to savor the irony). What is news is that Commissioner Pai has actually picked up an issue I’ve championed since 2006 — reform of the “designated entity” (DE) bidding credit. Unfortunately, as is too often the case IMO, Pai directs his outrage at the wrong target. Rather than seeking constructive solutions to the tension between auction theory (which favors the largest incumbents) and competition theory (which holds the need to make sure someone wins licenses other than the largest incumbents), Pai has decided to direct his wrath at DISH for finding a loophole in the auction structure stacked against them.

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New African Declaration Highlights Net Neutrality, Spectrum and Access to Information Principles

September 19, 2014 Internet Governance , Net Neutrality , Spectrum Reform

More than two dozen global civil society organizations, most of which are based in Africa, unveiled the African Declaration on Internet Rights and Freedoms at the Internet Governance Forum (IGF) held in Istanbul, Turkey earlier this month. The declaration’s main purpose is to create a widely endorsed standard within a human rights framework for internet-related policy making decisions in Africa.

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The Spectrum Gap Keeps Growing

August 17, 2012 Spectrum , Spectrum Licensing , Spectrum Reform

Recently there have been a number of high-profile spectrum transactions. It is possible to describe them in a way that sounds beneficial. In the Verizon/SpectrumCO transaction, a lot of spectrum that was not being used will be sold to a company that will actually use it. In the AT&T/NextWave transaction a lot of spectrum that is not being used will be sold to a company that will actually use it. In a vacuum it is true that spectrum is better off used than not used, and as a legal matter it’s also true that the FCC is generally not allowed to consider alternate buyers when deciding whether to approve a spectrum license transfer.

But this narrow view masks a large problem–a growing “spectrum gap” between Verizon and AT&T and the rest of the wireless industry, that is hobbling competition and harming consumers.

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The PCAST Report And The Inconvenient Truth About Federal Spectrum.

July 24, 2012 Spectrum Licensing , Spectrum Reform , White Space , Wi-Fi , Wireless

We have all kinds of reality-challenged folks in Washington. We got those who believe that we need to go back to the gold-standard and abolish the Federal Reserve. We got those who think vaccinations cause learning autism. To this we can now add “the folks who think we can keep finding federal spectrum to auction forever.”

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Public Interest Groups Ask FCC To Block Verizon Deals With Cable Companies

February 22, 2012 Press Release , Spectrum Reform , Verizon , VerizonSpectrumCo

The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) should not allow Verizon to enter into a complex series of transactions with the country’s largest cable companies, nine public-interest groups, led by Public Knowledge, said Tuesday.

In the filing, the groups said that Verizon’s arrangements to buy spectrum from Comcast, Time Warner Cable and Bright House, with a separate deal for Cox, would “would fundamentally alter the nature of the telecommunications world in a manner utterly contrary to that intended by the 1996 Telecommunications Act.”

The groups on the filing are: Public Knowledge, Media Access Project, the New America Foundation Open Technology Initiative, Benton Foundation,1 Access Humboldt, Center for Rural Strategies, Future of Music Coalition, National Consumer Law Center, on behalf of its low-income clients, and Writers Guild of America, West

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The Final Score on Spectrum Legislation: Bad Stuff Averted, Good Stuff Made Possible. I Call That A

February 17, 2012 Spectrum Licensing , Spectrum Reform , White Space , Wi-Fi , Wireless

Last month, we warned about how some folks in Congress (with support of the usual suspects) wanted to get some really bad law on the future of wireless included in the Payroll Tax Cut Extension. The proposed law would have:

a. Stopped the FCC from having any kind of net neutrality conditions on any future wireless services the FCC would create by auctioning more wireless spectrum licenses.

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