Items tagged "Spectrum Reform"

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Public Interest Groups Call Spectrum Legislation ‘Massive Step Backwards’

February 13, 2012 Press Release , Spectrum Reform

Eighteen public interest and other groups today asked that Congress protect unlicensed spectrum in any agreement to provide funds for the payroll tax cut or other legislative spending.

In the letter to the conferees on the tax legislation, the groups said that the provisions now in the bill, “would be a massive step backwards in the evolution of our Nation’s wireless policy. They would lead to greater consolidation, higher consumer costs, and reduced openness in the wireless industry.”

The group said there were three concerns that needed to be addressed — that there are no safeguards for an open network, no safeguards against further industry consolidation and that the legislation would eliminate new “Super-WiFi.”

A copy of the letter is here.

Those signing the letter are:

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It’s Never Over For AT&T: Sting Of ATTMobile Defeat Lingers On and On

January 31, 2012 AT&T , FCC , Spectrum Reform

This is a great week for taking a step back for a good look at how Washington works.  It’s also a great demonstration of that wonderful saying, “It’s never over until it’s over.  And it’s never over.”

On the menu are AT&T’s failed takeover of T-Mobile, a bill to set rules for spectrum auctions, a payroll tax bill pending in Congress, a bill to change FCC procedures, and Verizon’s planned collaboration with Comcast and other cable companies.   They all have something in common:  big companies trying to obtain their fair advantage over consumers and competitors.  In these cases, it’s generally in the wireless market.

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Why The Spectrum Section of the Jobs Bill Is An OMB Fantasy and a Political and Policy Nightmare

September 16, 2011 FCC , NTIA , Spectrum Licensing , Spectrum Reform , Wireless

Not surprisingly, the ubiquitous combination of incentive auctions/D Block re-allocation/Public Safety Network has made its way into the proposed American Jobs Act. Somewhat surprisingly, the spectrum piece is not simply a reprint of the Hutchison/Rockefeller S.911 Bill or the Democratic House discussion draft. It’s not even a straight cut and paste from Reid’s Debt Ceiling/Deficit Reduction draft (Reid being the one who introduced the President’s Bill) that gave the broadcasters conniptions but raised the revenue for debt reduction.

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Squeezing More Blood From The Spectrum Turnip — Harry Reid’s Contribution To The Spectrum Muddle

July 26, 2011 FCC , Spectrum Licensing , Spectrum Reform , White Space , Wireless

No sooner had I posted my wonkish critique of the Congressional Budget Office (CBO) score for S.911, the Rockefeller Public Safety/Spectrum Bill over on my Wetmachine blog (“Where snark meets wonk and the sparks fly!”) when Senator Harry Reid (D-NV) turns around and drops a new version of the plan as part of his debt ceiling bill (Best version of Debt Ceiling bill I could find here).

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On today’s podcast, we discuss the time traveling spectrum bill, monkey copyright, Comcast running into trouble with data caps, and updates from the Creators Freedom Project.  We also discuss Newport Television’s attempt to silence criticism from Free Press by sending them a bogus DMCA takedown notice with Free Press Policy Counsel Corie Wright.


Working with Outside the Box Music, we’re putting on our next “Rock Your Net” Internet marketing series, which starts August 4th in Nashville, TN. For more details, go here.

Parachute Musical and Ocean Is Theory, two bands that CFP is working with have a show in DC on Saturday, July 23 at DC9. More details on the bands’ websites, download a free track from both bands here.

The 1861 Project is having its Album Release party next Tues, July 19 @ 7PM at Nashville’s Basement. To RSVP, check out this Facebook Event.

You can download the audio directly by clicking here (MP3) or stream it using the player below:

Want to subscribe to our podcast? Click here for the MP3 feed.

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Sauce for the Goose: An Addendum To My “Auctioning Unlicensed” Post

July 15, 2011 Competition , FCC , Spectrum Licensing , Spectrum Reform , Unlicensed frequencies

Yesterday, I posted why the proposal in the House Republican Spectrum Reform discussion draft makes no sense economically. For those who would argue that it does, I reply: then it ought to run both ways. In every auction, the FCC ought to be required to present two options: the licensed option for individuals and the unlicensed option for “collective” bidding.

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Why The Proposed “Unlicensed Auction” Is Such A Phenomonally Bad Idea — The Economics.

July 14, 2011 FCC , Spectrum Licensing , Spectrum Reform , White Space , Wireless

To call the discussion draft on spectrum reform circulated by House Commerce Commitee Republicans “flawed” understates the matter almost to the point of absurdity.

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The Spectrum Policy Time Machine

July 13, 2011 Spectrum , Spectrum Licensing , Spectrum Reform , White Space

Since when does setting good spectrum policy require a time machine? Because that’s what the draft House Republican spectrum bill (the “Spectrum Innovation Act of 2011”) does. Look at page 26 of the bill to see what I mean. The bill tries to free up more spectrum for broadband, but it does it in a way that threatens the future of unlicensed spectrum, one of the key things that has made broadband take off.

Millions of people use Wi-Fi every day. It’s one of those ubiquitous technologies that works as a glue holding our proliferating gadgets together. Wireless ISPs use it to connect people to the Internet in places where there might otherwise be poor or no service. Coffee shops and other public places offer it as a basic amenity.

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What Do CTIA and The GPS Council Have In Common? The Lightsquared Fight Expands to Satellite ATC Gen

July 6, 2011 Broadband , FCC , Spectrum Licensing , Spectrum Reform , Wireless

I’ve written quite a bit recently about the fight of would-be new entrant Lightsquared to build a wholesale LTE service over the objections of the GPS industry. For those looking for an incredibly lengthy and rather opinionated history and the issues, I recommend my Insanely Long Field Guide To Lightsquared v. the GPS Guys. For something much shorter and to the point, you can find my op ed piece on GigaOm here. The short version is that Lightsquared does, in fact, cause interference with GPS, even though it is operating under rules the FCC approved in 2003. This brings us to the question of who bears the cost of trying to make Lightsquared, or any new system, work.

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Why Congress Should Not Micromanage Incentive Auctions (Assuming They Happen)

April 8, 2011 Broadband , FCC , Spectrum Reform , White Space , Wireless

Yesterday I attended the White House event on incentive auctions. It was probably the most sensible public event on the pro-incentive auction side I’ve attended to date. While I have had several discussions with Federal Communications Commission (FCC) staff that persuade me that, if Congress gave the FCC generic authority to do voluntary incentive auctions (subject to limitations to protect broadcasters – including low-power broadcasters – that want to stay in the broadcasting business), they could design a pretty good auction that would get more spectrum out for both licensed and unlicensed broadband access.

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