Items tagged "Spectrum Reform"

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Where the Carriers Roam

August 18, 2008 FCC , Spectrum Reform

I'm a Sprint customer, but thanks to something called "automatic roaming," I can be reached in the DC Metro subway system, where only Verizon has service. Unfortunately, because of a recent FCC order, wireless customers like me might soon be harder to reach when on the move.

Wireless roaming agreements allow customers of one carrier to get service in areas where that carrier does not have its own network. Unfortunately, a gaping hole in some recent regulation means that an order meant to ensure that wireless customers get the best possible service might actually mean that some customers don’t get any service at all, even in their home region – especially if they’re customers of one of the smaller competitive carriers. This past week, we filed a letter urging the FCC to fix the problem and ensure continued customer access to wireless networks.

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Of Wireless Microphones, Broadcast White Spaces, Field Testing, and Public Safety.

July 21, 2008 FCC , Spectrum Reform , White Space

As folks may have heard, the Public Interest Spectrum Coalition filed a complaint against wireless microphone manufacturers and a Petition for Rulemaking last week. As I explain on my Wetmachine blog here, the filing has the dual purpose of cleaning up a potentially nasty mess in the broadcast UHF bands before the public safety and new commercial services start operating on Channels 52-69, and finally have an honest conversation about wireless microphones in the context of the FCC's ongoing proceeding to open the white spaces to productive use. (FCC Docket No.

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iPhone 3G and the Problem with AT&T’s “Subsidy”

July 8, 2008 Broadband , Spectrum Reform

I'm the sucker who just over a year ago got up at 5AM to sit in a line until 6PM to buy an iPhone. There are a lot of people like me, I met many of them in line that long day. It was actually a lot of fun, but had I known that if I had just shown up at the Apple Store at 7PM that night, I could have walked out with the same iPhone, since there was plenty of supply, I think I would have done the latter. Since June 29, 2007, I have been incredibly in love with this new computing platform called the iPhone, and I've written about it a bit before.

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Deregulation !=Competition: an observation from the OECD Seoul Ministerial

June 18, 2008 Broadband , FCC , Internet Protocol , Network Neutrality , Spectrum Reform

For the past couple of days, I've been in South Korea, attending the OECD's Ministerial on the Future of the Internet Economy. Rather than try to give a blow-by-blow account, I've tried to package some of my thoughts in a series of posts. Here's one:

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The New Clearwire

May 12, 2008 Broadband , Network Neutrality , Spectrum Reform

The new Clearwire could be game-changing, but the rules of the game may not be quite as Clearwire presents them. I have been wondering since last July whether something significant would happen in the Google/Sprint world. The deal announcement earlier this weekseems to be that key development. (Here's the press release and here are slides describing the transaction.)

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Tying, subsidizing, and IMS

May 8, 2008 FCC , Network Neutrality , Spectrum Reform

In response to my post a couple of days ago about the possibility that VZ might not plan to comply with the 700 MHz "open platform" rules, someone wrote:

would you have the FCC mandate that every mobile device must be capable of running every operating system? If Verizon sells me a BlackBerry, should the device allow me to install Android, Palm OS, Windows Mobile, or Symbian OS? Obviously, Google believes the answer is yes (they will make the most money if they can install their OS on every device). Is it good for consumers if the FCC starts managing software specifications for computers and mobile devices?

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700 MHz Update: Will VZ comply with the rules?

May 6, 2008 FCC , Network Neutrality , Spectrum Reform

Last Friday (HT: IPDemocracy), Google filed a petition [PDF] asking that the Commission ensure that Verizon understands what those "open platform" requirements for the C Block really mean. Verizon has taken the position in the past that its own devices won't be subject to the "open applications" and "open handsets" requirements of the C Block rules, and Google says it is concerned that Verizon doesn't plan to follow those requirements in the future.

This is big. Here's the background.

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The $19 Billion Dollar Loophole

March 25, 2008 Spectrum Reform , White Space

Shareholders for Verizon, AT&T, and other companies that paid big money in the 700 MHz auction may want to check the fine print and hold back on final payment. Thanks to a quirk in the FCC's rules, the NFL, the MPAA, and other users of "broadcast ancillary services" (BAS) may have superior rights in the spectrum.

I've written a longer and more technical version of this on my Tales of the Sausage Factory blog. But for those without the patience for the long story, here's the quick version of what may turn out to be the funniest and most expensive joke in FCC history.

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Why Block C matters

March 21, 2008 FCC , Spectrum Reform

Today the FCC announced the winners of the 700 MHz auction – and you can see from pp. 62-63 of this document that Verizon won Block C. (Block C was set up in two nationwide paired blocks of 11 MHz each, which were auctioned off in very large geographic areas—12 licenses, each covering a “Regional Economic Area Grouping”. Verizon won seven of the twelve licenses, covering all of the US except Alaska, Puerto Rico, American Samoa, Guam, and the Northern Mariana Islands.)

Why does this matter?

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700 MHz Auction Mostly Over.

March 19, 2008 FCC , Spectrum Reform

At long last, the FCC went three rounds without any new bids and declared Auction 73 (better known as Battle 700 MHz) closed. You can see the final provisional winning bids on the FCC's Auction 73 page here.

Of course, we are all waiting to see who won what licenses, particularly C Block. But we have some preliminaries to go through first. Most importantly, the FCC has to make a decision on whether to sever the D Block from the Auction so that it can investigate what happened, especially the allegations around Cyren Call and Morgan O'Brien.

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