Items tagged "TV Everywhere"

Press Release

Public Knowledge Tells FCC To Protect Web Video, Re-Think Broadband Benchmarks

September 2, 2009 Broadband , FCC , MVPD , Press Release , TV Everywhere

In testimony to FCC workshops, Public Knowledge President Gigi B. Sohn will recommend tomorrow that the FCC use its National Broadband Plan to protect consumer access to "over-the-top" video services like Hulu. Legal Director Harold Feld will recommend today that the Commission expand its set of broadband benchmarks while using new data-collection techniques to include a wider "broadband ecology." Sohn will testify tomorrow on the panel dealing with Internet TV issues, scheduled for 11:15 a.m.

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Cable Companies Love to Compete, Right?

February 21, 2012 Comcast , Competition , MVPD , Set-Top Box , TV Everywhere

Although Comcast’s announcement that it is preparing to launch a Netflix competitor may be a step forward for online video competition, it also highlights the dirty little secret about cable companies – they do everything they can to avoid competing with one another.

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PK In the Know Podcast

August 12, 2011 DRM , Music , TV Everywhere

On today’s podcast, we discuss Jay-Z and Kanye’s successful battle against album leaks, avoiding the Apple app store rules with rich web apps, cable and satellite drifting towards luxury-only, and Walmart having to keep its DRM servers on even after it closes its online music store.  We also talk with Cody Sumter and Jason Boggess of Minecraft.Print(), the script that bridges the worlds of 3D printing and Minecraft.

You can download the audio directly by clicking here (MP3) or stream it using the player below:

Want to subscribe to our podcast? Click here for the MP3 feed.

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On today’s podcast we discuss arbitrary wireless internet limits, the potential marriage of DirectTV and Hulu, and the new British report on using evidence to make copyright policy.  We also solicit questions from our listeners for future shows.

You can download the audio directly by clicking here (MP3) or stream it using the player below:

Want to subscribe to our podcast? Click here for the MP3 feed.

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PK In the Know Podcast

July 29, 2011 Competition , Innovation , Piracy , TV Everywhere

On today’s podcast we mark a TWiT.tv milestone, discuss Fox pulling content from Hulu, and consider Ars Technica making money selling free content.  We also chat with Paul Geller of Grooveshark about why Grooveshark decided to engage with policymakers here in Washington, DC.

You can download the audio directly by clicking here (MP3) or stream it using the player below:

Want to subscribe to our podcast? Click here for the MP3 feed.

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TV Networks Grow Tired of Pretty Face, Decide to Cut off Nose

July 27, 2011 Piracy , TV Everywhere

It is being widely reported today that Fox is removing next-day content from Hulu for everyone but selected “verified” cable and satellite subscribers, and that other networks are considering following suit.  Under the new plan, the only people who could watch content in the week following the original airdate are people who already subscribe to some subset of approved cable and satellite services.  This makes sense everywhere but in reality.

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PK In the Know Podcast

October 29, 2010 Innovation , Mobile Communication , MVPD , TV Everywhere

On today’s podcast, we talk the Fox/Cablevision retransmission battle, Comcast’s announcement that you don’t need to be on a Comcast Internet connection to get Xfinity video, Apple’s universal SIM card that will never be useful in the United States, the copyright protections that were the secret to Netflix’s success, and Amazon’s small step towards allowing book sharing on the Kindle.

You can download the audio directly by clicking here (MP3) or stream it using the player below:

Want to subscribe to our podcast? Click here for the MP3 feed and here for the mixed audio/video feed.

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Bad News For Over-The-Top Video Providers Last Week.

April 25, 2010 Broadband , Comcast , FCC , MVPD , TV Everywhere

Last Wednesday, those trying to use broadband to compete with cable video offerings (aka “over-the-top” video providers) lost the first round in a small but important case: Sky Angel v. Discovery Channel. Happily, it’s only the first round. But the preliminary ruling by the FCC’s Media Bureau (“MB”) highlights why either Congress or the full Commission needs to focus on the question of whether the rules that protect cable competition (or, as we in the field say, “multichannel video programming distributors” or “MVPDs” — which includes everything from traditional cable to FIOS to satellite) will also protect competition for online providers.

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Over-the-Air Viewers Left Out of NBC’s Online Future

February 24, 2010 MVPD , Spectrum , Spectrum Reform , TV Everywhere

NBC's Olympics coverage, both on TV and online, hasn't won high marks. Business Insider writes that NBC's TV coverage is "ruining the Olympics for millions of Americans." Harsh. Its Internet coverage is also unavailable to the millions of Americans who watch TV over the air, undermining NBC's position that broadcast television remains an important part of its business.

It seems that over-the-air viewers, who probably watch more ads per hour than DVR-addicted home theater types–not to mention cord-cutters and "Cable's Lost Generation"–are harder to monetize than cable, satellite, and telco video subscription customers.

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DECE and the War on Ownership

January 15, 2010 Analog Hole , Anti-circumvention , DRM , MVPD , TV Everywhere

In the media world, there’s an ongoing war about what it means to “own” a copy of something. Most of us are used to the world of paper books and plastic CDs, where the media you buy is yours to do what you like with, be that play it in your living room, lend it to a friend, or (as a practical matter) rip it to your computer for your own use on other devices or locations. But in the world of DRM, the copyright owner gets to decide when, if, and for how long you get to do those things. The latest salvo in the battle to get consumers to accept DRM is DECE: the “Digital Entertainment Content Ecosystem.” DECE appears to be an attempt to make DRM interoperate better across different devices, services, and content sources. Is this a good thing – or at least a less bad thing – for content users? I’m not holding my breath…

**Ownership vs.

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